You Can Freeze a Whole Peach

You Can Freeze a Whole Peach

Stick around here, and you might learn a thing or two from me every once in a while.  But I guarantee that if you stick around here, you’ll learn loads of great information from all my readers!  You all continue to amaze me with all of your cool, helpful, and time-saving knowledge.  Ahhh, I love walking this homemaking journey with all of you.  {wipes a tear with her stained apron}

Here’s the latest comment that had many of us saying, “Really?  You can do that?! I can’t wait to try it!”

On my 10 Healthy and Easy Peach Recipes post, Jenny from DIY Parenting said, “We learned something VERY exciting last year… you can freeze whole peaches! Wash them, let them dry, then put them on a tray whole WITH the skins in the freezer. Once they are frozen solid, put them into freezer bags. Take out one as you need it. While still frozen, you can easily run your hands over the skin under water to remove it (if you want). Then let sit until thawed. This is how we now enjoy peaches, with no added sugar and without canning them, all year long.”

Well now that’s a tip that will save me loads of time and effort.  I decided to try it.  (How many of you did too?)

Into the freezer went some peaches…

freezing_peaches_1

Once frozen, I peeled one, just to see how easy it was.  Oh wow, look at how that skin came right off with no effort at all!

freezing_peaches_2
For the record, we will generally be eating our peaches with the skin on, but one or two of my kids prefer it skinless – and at this point, I figure, hey whatever gets them to eat a peach, right?

I then sliced the peach into some cottage cheese for a refreshing snack.  It was heaven in a bowl.  And it was practically effortless.

freezing_peaches_4

You know what I love best about this freezing peaches whole tip?  (Besides how easy it is – because truly, this process could not get any easier. Unless I send my kids to the freezer with the peaches. Which I will. But besides that.)  I love that the nutrients in the peach are preserved with this method.  Home canned peaches are great, but the cooking process does kill some of the nutrients.  Frozen peaches though?  Straight from tree to freezer, then into a bowl for a snack.  Nourishing, and so juicy and delicious.

Jenny – I’m so thankful you shared this tip.  You’ve changed the way I’ll preserve peaches from now on.

Whatever shall I do with all my extra time??

This post was originally published August 29, 2013.

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Comments

  1. Angela says

    So..If I froze whole peaches and then peeled the skins off…could I then use the peaches in cobblers or pies? Or will they be to mushy?

    [Reply]

    Jenny Reply:

    From my experience, they work great for pies, cobblers & crisps! Not too mushy. They even slice quite nicely even when they’re still a tad bit frozen.

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  2. Kathy says

    Great tip. Please do another post on other fruits we didn’t know could be frozen whole! Mangoes? Guavas?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I don’t know about other fruits – maybe we should experiment to find out!

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    pauline Reply:

    In El Salvador where we live, frozen mangos are a REAL treat, but mostly because having a freezer is so much of a luxury. Here we wash them , freeze them, eat them! But, that means needing front teeth that can stand that cold and also means for some people spitting out the skins. I doubt that the skins would be as easy to peel as the frozen peaches, but ought to be fairly east to peel with a peeler if you want the mango for a dessert of some kind and don’t want to use the skins.

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Thanks, Pauline!

  3. Shannon says

    I am the same way about eating peach skin. They are furry and I just can’t stand that furry feeling on my tongue.

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  4. Rosanne says

    Thank you for the great tip, it’s wonderful how the universe usually gives you an answer when its needed! As I just bought two baskets full of ripe peaches and didn’t know how to preserve them quickly! I

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  5. Lana says

    Woo Hoo! I need to get some peaches quick before they are gone!

    You can do the same with whole tomatoes. Use them for cooking. The skins slip right off just like the peaches.

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    Jill Reply:

    I wrote a post on the freezing of whole tomatoes:
    http://braverhomesandgardens.blogspot.com/2011/02/curing-cabin-fever-tomato-soup.html

    Best discovery I ever made. I’m going to hit our produce stand this weekend in search of peaches now.

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    Hallie Reply:

    Oh, my, Jill. I just read your aforementioned post. How hungry it made me! Wishing even more now I had another freezer and had planted tomatoes this year!

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    Raquel H Reply:

    I just checked your post, thank you!!! Between the peach tip and this tomato freezing tip I’m so happy!! This gives me the choice for when I don’t have time for canning. Now the only reason I can think of for canning would be in case of no refrigeration… :)

    [Reply]

  6. Michelle says

    NO WAY. I must research. Peaches, plums, nectarines and pluots are so so good right now and I want some in January. Plus our freezer is just too empty.

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  7. krisha says

    You can also freeze whole tomatoes and the skins will come right off – I do this until I have enough to can a batch. I’ve also frozen sliced whole peaches for ease of use for smoothies, etc. I just layer them in parchment paper, freeze, then place in ziplocs.

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    Rebecca Reply:

    I do this too. I have no time to can with the kids home in the summer with two having disabilities that require constant monitoring. I just put all the tomatoes whole in bags and freeze, then thaw and can in october while school is in session. I froze a bushel of peach slices, with the skin on to make jam with in the fall also, and will do the same with raspberries in a few weeks. Plus its soo much cooler to can in october.

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  8. Charlotte Moore says

    I can’t stand that fuzz in my mouth. Plus it feels rough on my tongue. I love nectarines and can eat that peeling. My husband can wash a peach and just eat it. YUCK!!!

    [Reply]

  9. Lisa says

    Good to know!! Speaking of nutrients in frozen foods, I wonder if it’s really necessary to blanch fruits/veggies before freezing. I like them better straight into the freezer myself and it’s so much quicker. Is my family missing out o all the nutrients when I don’t blanch?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I’m not an expert on that, but I think it’s fine to skip the blanching part. Maybe others who know more about that can answer better. :)

    [Reply]

    Trudi Reply:

    All blanching really does for fruit is make it easier to remove the peel. However it’s definitely necessary to blanch vegetables before freezing. There are enzymes present in vegetables that cause chemical changes to occur, which in turn cause nutritional loss and really undesirable flavors. Blanching stops the enzyme activity. The only vegetable I don’t blanch before freezing is onions. I took a friend’s suggestion once and froze corn on the cob without blanching, but it changed the texture quite a bit and there was huge loss of flavor (as in NO flavor!). Of course we didn’t want to throw it away, so we slowly plowed through about 20 packages of frozen tasteless, watery, rubbery corn on the cob that winter! :)

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  10. Kentuckylady717 says

    Great idea Laura, thanks….will definitely try it…for sure you do learn a lot from your viewers……I love to hear what all they have to say :)

    [Reply]

  11. Kimberly in NC says

    Maybe Jenny should be awarded a nice prize for sharing such a helpful tip? I know I sure appreciated it! Thanks again!

    [Reply]

  12. Hallie says

    About a year ago I learned one can freeze avocados and guacamole. That was a huge discovery for me. Just cut the meat out, place in a ziplock and you’re good to go. I was so happy to find a way to save avocados from spoiling and a way to stock up on them when they are at their cheapest, so I can indulge in them when a craving strikes. After reading about peaches and tomatoes, I’m wanting another freezer!

    [Reply]

    Jenny Reply:

    Avocados! Good idea!

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  13. says

    I love this idea, but I suspect that peaches frozen without blanching will not last as long in the freezer as blanched peaches. For something to keep a long time in the freezer the enzymes need to be denatured to stop their activity. I’m going to use the freezing whole idea for peaches I will use up in a few months. Has anyone had experience with this? How long were they good in the freezer?

    [Reply]

    Jenny Reply:

    We’re still eating a few from last summer. They’re holding up and tasting great! I’m thinking, even though they are not blanched, maybe keeping the skin on is helping protect/preserve them a bit?

    [Reply]

  14. Helen says

    How great is this!! I’m taking this information to our next Ladies Bible Class to share with them, many of whom do canning but have never talked about this possibility. Maybe they don’t know…yet! Thanks so much for sharing!

    [Reply]

  15. Karen says

    Because of this post and helpful idea, I purchased a “truck load” of peaches today from a farmer’s market for a great price. Thanks to your reader who shared this too!

    [Reply]

  16. Jackie Blair says

    Wow. What a great share. This is something I learnt new today and I will for sure be doing this. Thanks so much

    [Reply]

  17. Margaret says

    I wish I had seen this last week. I peeled and sliced 20 pounds of peaches. Oh well, now I know and will do this next time I have 25 pounds of peaches.

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  18. Donna says

    I am now thinking I need to go way back and start reading through your archives Laura. I have missed out on some great info. even though I have read your blog for a few years. Thank you for re-posting some oldies but goodies while you were away!

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  19. Erin says

    What a great idea! My mom has been making the best persimmon cookies around for many a Christmas and she has always frozen her persimmons whole first. This does a couple things. One, it allows you to pick them up on sale and keep them until needed as well as keep extras for later in the year. It also softens the persimmon to the right texture for the cookies once thawed. The skins slip off easily on the partially thawed persimmons too.

    I love the freezing tomatoes and avocadoes idea! Great post.

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  20. Betty Stewart says

    I tried freezing the peaches whole last summer and this winter when I tried to eat them they were awful. Brown and muschy and unappetizing.

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  21. says

    Guess what? You can do that with fresh tomatoes too! Do it exactly the same way. Mmm fresh tomatoes in the winter for soups etc.

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  22. Holley says

    Do you freeze them before they are ripe enough to eat or do you let them ripen all the way until they feel a little soft? Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    You can freeze them at any point, although I usually freeze them when they are ripe enough to eat.

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  23. Martha Staton says

    Thank you for providing information regarding being able to FREEZE WHOLE PEACHES. I did not know this information.

    [Reply]

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