What If I Can’t Buy Raw Milk?

raw_milk

“Laura, what would you do if you couldn’t get raw milk for your family?”

It’s a question I receive often – from those who either don’t have a good source for raw milk in their area or because the cost involved would cause them to take out a second mortgage. 

Well, as of just a few weeks ago, our family is without our fresh, raw milk. So now I get to answer this question from first hand experience!

Why are we no longer getting grass fed, farm fresh, raw milk? (Oh, just typing all of that deliciousness makes me miss it!)  Thankfully, this is just a temporary change for us, as our milk supplier has dried up her cow for a few months. Come August, we’ll be getting the best of the best again. For just $5 a gallon. We are so spoiled!

In the meantime, I could call on other sources around here for raw milk. I decided not to do that for two reasons:  1) I felt it was rude of me to say, “Hi. I need some of your milk for three months, but then I’ll no longer need you again so really, it’s like I’m just using you right now.” and 2) I didn’t want to go to the trouble of figuring out all the details. 

Lazy? Sort of. Mostly I just needed one less thing to do. Or I didn’t need one more thing to do. Or something like that.

So what are we doing about milk during these three months?

We have chosen to buy whole, organic milk from the store. It is likely from cows which were not entirely grass fed. It is very pastuerized and homogenized. But at least it doesn’t have growth hormones or antibiotics. It’s not the best, but it is a better choice, so I’m okay with it. 

We’ve also chosen not to guzzle down three gallons of milk each week like we used to. We’ve used our one weekly gallon mainly for cooking.

I’ve taken a little break too from making yogurt, kefir, and buttermilk. I miss it! In the meantime, I’m getting organic whole milk yogurt from Azure Standard or Trader Joes when I have access. 

I also stocked up on organic coconut milk when it was on sale at Vitacost a few weeks ago. That is great for a healthy variety, plus it’s perfect for making smoothies!

Come August, we’ll be having a raw milk party at our house. I can’t wait! In the meantime, I feel at peace with our choice to buy organic milk from the store. 

What kind of milk works for your family? Raw milk, organic milk, regular milk, no milk, coconut milk, goat milk?  (Wow, look at all the choices!)

Comments

  1. says

    We have two dairy goats…….so we drink raw goat milk.

    Well, the rest of the family drinks raw goat’s milk. I’m pregnant and my midwife doesn’t want me drinking it unless we test it…..and we don’t test it, so…I drink whole milk from the store. Once baby arrives I’ll drink the goat’s milk like everyone else.

    What I can’t believe is that your family only drinks 3 gallons of milk a week! We have been known to drink a gallon in 4 hours, and that was before we got the goats! Right now we only have one goat in milk. She’s giving a half gallon a day, and the kids and hubby drink every last bit of that every day. They’d drink more if I’d let them. :)

    In a month, our other goat’s kids will be weaned and we should be getting about a gallon a day. I am very much looking forward to having enough milk for cheese and yogurt and….

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  2. Sharon says

    We buy cream top milk. It is low vat pasteurized and it is not homogenized. It is rsbt free and anti-biotic free.

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  3. Merry Jo says

    Raw milk isn’t legal to sell in our state of MD. :( So we get local, grass-fed, lightly pasteurized milk (the least pasteurization allowed by law). It’s the best thing around, but I am jealous of you! :)

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    Jamie Garcia Reply:

    We used to go to PA, there are also buying clubs that go to PA farms, look them up!

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  4. jessica says

    I’ve been buying milk at the local organic dairy farm 15 miles from our house. No hormones or antibiotics, grass fed and non GMO feed grown right on the farm. I pay $4.50 a gallon for creamline whole milk. The milk is not homogenized. So fun to have to shake the milk before we use it!

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  5. Cheryl says

    Raw milk is illegal in Canada. Growth hormones are not permitted in Canadian dairy farming. Health Canada does not permit the use of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST). Which is legal in other countries. We’ve been looking into local goat’s milk though.

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  6. Gail Medaris says

    We drink raw milk from a farm on the Omaha side of Lincoln. We were out of town this past weekend and missed our pick up ( we are apart of a driving co-op) so we drink Kalona milk it is from grass fed cows, very low temp pastuerized and non-homogenized. It is sold at Whole foods and Hy-Vee!

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    Laura Reply:

    I am really glad to find out about this! I’ll check it out next time I’m in Lincoln. :)

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  7. Missy says

    I bought a half-gallon of ‘Raw for pet consumption only’ about 2 weeks ago. It is illegal to sell it for human consumption in TN, GA, AL, and FL to name a few. I asked the man selling it if it was really ‘just for pet consumption only.’ He said he’d been drinking it for 20+ years and never had an issue. ;). I’d never bought raw milk before ($4/ half-gal) but wanted to try it. I liked the idea of shaking it up to get the richness of the cream back into the milk. My kids however didn’t like it at all. It was a bit of a stretch for me as well. Raised on homogenized, ultra pasteurized milk will do that to you. Anyway, I gave it to my kids in their cereal, oatmeal, etc and they didn’t notice. One thing I didn’t consider was how quickly it would sour. Oh well…I’d been buying organic milk from the store before that and I guess that’s what I’ll continue to do. We don’t drink a whole lot of milk anyway. It was a fun experiment. :)

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  8. Ann Marie says

    We drink skim milk from the store ( I can just hear the horrified gasps and see you cringing). I can’t fit organic in our grocery budget right now but I do buy a brand that is antibiotic free and does not contain any growth hormones. I’m contemplating trying the whole, raw milk thing at some point but have to admit there is a fear factor plus I have no idea how to find a reputable source in my area.

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  9. Jill Oldehoeft says

    Where around York can one purchase raw milk. I asked Callahan Chiropractic and they were going to let me know and never have.
    Thanks.

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    Laura Reply:

    Jill, email me (laura at heavenlyhomemakers.com) and I’ll give you the phone number of a family near Henderson who is a great source!

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  10. Amanda says

    We do a combination of rice milk and regular cow’s milk. When we could afford it, we bought organic milk, but finances have been really tight, so we had to switch to regular. We use rice milk more than cow’s milk in general, because all of the kids as toddlers had issues with dairy, and it gives me migraines and stomach aches- my husband just doesn’t want to give it up, so I buy it mostly for him!

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  11. SV says

    We used to drink skim milk with the occasional whole milk 1/2 gallon for my husband. When it came time for our third kiddo to start drinking whole milk around age 1 a couple years ago, we found he disliked it so much he would spit it all over the place. Never had a problem with that before with his big sisters so we would try every few days…this went on for months…always with the same results: a mess for Mommy to clean up. He didn’t like any of the yogurts we bought (YoBaby/Greek/Organic yummy stuff from Whole Foods) and wasn’t overly fond of cheese (though he would eat that once in a while). The solution ended up being that we now drink Almond milk (even making it when we can). He loves it and the rest of us do, too. We eat less cereal and have just one cup of milk a day…but it has gotten everyone loving their water, which makes me VERY happy. It actually got us to look at all the foods we’ve been eating and make lots of good changes…so a definite positive for our family. :)

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    SV Reply:

    I want to also mention that our pediatricians have all been very supportive (not that doctors are the be-all end-all, but just in case this was a concern for someone reading this). Store-bought Almond Milks contain those Vitamins A & D that were of most concern to the doctors. He got good fats from other foods. Another reason I’m absolutely all right with this is because my husband and children are all Asian and my husband has ended up being lactose-intolerant (VERY common for Asians…something like 80-90% are) and we’ve reduced dairy dramatically as a result. The fact that we were already drinking Almond and Coconut milks and avoiding yogurts and cheeses made that an easy transition.

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    Rachel Reply:

    Our doctor told us to switch our daughter to Almond milk, unsweetened because new studies are showing that dairy (ALL dairy, goat/cow, cheese etc) is prone to cause ear infections in children. Because milk is meant for a baby calf/kid to grow and it has lots of proteins to stimulate growth… and in a human that’s both good and bad, if you have bad bacteria it also causes that to grow too. And he told us she will get more calcium from Almond milk anyway.

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  12. Deb says

    Even Aldi milk doesn’t have the rbST anymore, so I think that might be an issue of the past, but anyway, I buy the 2% at Costco. My son actually worked on a dairy farm a few years back and this city girl could not stomach that milk, it was straight from the farm and smelled and tasted like it. It was fresh, (still warm when he brought it home), just not for me. Old habits die hard I guess. ;)

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  13. abbie says

    We were drinking raw goats from our go
    at but we use more than she was producing. We are selling our goats and saving fir a cow. I have a neighboring who milks 3 jerseys i buy it for 6 a gallon. When it was not available i would buy the Kalona milk that was low past and wasn’t homo, also another brand in our area is called memory lane and its also cream top and organic valley now has a low f past and cream top, i personally would buy store bought homo milk before i bought ultra past milk, the fact that the milk is shelf stable with out refrigeration is just ti weird it also just is kinda weird when it clabbers. But that’s just me, luckily i live in an area with a awesome farmers market and its now legal in Arkansas for farmers to sell raw milk and for people to buy it not for pet use but for human consumption. :)

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  14. says

    I make my yogurt with whole milk and powered milk we drink lot of powered milk we strich the milk 1/2 and 1/2 whole milk 1 gl makes 2 gl’s of milk

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  15. unprocessed woman says

    If anyone cannot get raw milk, with all the nutrition information out there, one should or can know that there are plenty of calcium sources in nature that do not require “milk”. No one should feel anxious.

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  16. says

    Wow! One gallon a week would never work here. That is why we can’t use organic either. We were trying hard to cut back and use only the organic, but found it had a weird taste the kids didn’t like. I was able to drink past it but it was odd. I also got to thinking about how silly it was to drink organic milk, but not eat organic cheese. We eat a lot of cheese. I don’t know. It adds up monetarily and it isn’t a pretty number for a house of seven.

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  17. Jenny says

    We are drinking regular old whole milk from the grocery store. I’m working on maneuvering our budget around to organic.

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  18. Kat says

    while we can purchase raw milk (at the farm), we actually have chosen not to–at $10/gallon, it is a little hard to swallow. Also, when there was some inconsistency with the supply, I felt my questions were not being answered completely and truthfully. Now we purchase a local, pastured, low temp pasteurized, non homogenized milk. It tastes better, costs significantly less, and still works for kefir. We limit our consumption to about 2 gallons per week.

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  19. says

    Our son Gabriel and his family live in an Amish community and they all drink raw milk. Wish I could.
    On a separate note Laura, I am writing a series that perhaps some of your readers would identify with, a food addiction. It is tough baring my soul but I think I could use some help and perhaps others do to.
    Blessings

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  20. says

    I went to a dairy farm and he said that they are required by law to test all the milk to make sure there are not antibiotics in it. It was all pumped into a dairy truck and taken to the bottling place and they also tested it. If the test showed positive for antibiotics the farmer would lose the entire shipment. He swore that there was no difference in his milk and the organic milk at the grocery store. I still buy organic, whole milk, but I’m considering switching to raw.

    Do organic milk farmers not use antibiotics at all? It seemed that he did use them, but the milk was tested to make sure it was not present in it.

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    Tina Reply:

    My husband works in the dairy industry as a dairy nutritionist. He has done research on antibiotics in milk. There is no difference in the milk from cows that are given growth hormone or antibiotics and those that are not. We drink regular milk from the store and don’t worry about it at all.

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  21. Heidi says

    We cannot buy raw milk here anymore. Illegal now. Sigh.

    We have used almond milk–I tried one disabled child here on a dairy-free diet, and was buying the almond milk. Our naturopath cautioned that the almonds are washed in benzine–not healthy at all. So when we have almond milk, we make it. I just read on some group on FB yesterday that the key is the use a coffee grinder to get it really fine–and less grainy. Shake it well, anyway. I did read once to use lecithin to emulsify it better, but at that time only could find soy lecithin–we avoid soy when possible–so didn’t bother. You can also add a little vanilla or other flavoring if you wish.

    We have also made rice milk, with similar results. :)

    We cannot afford most organic dairy, so we just be certain to get whole milk with no added hormones.

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  22. Alyssa B. says

    We have been drinking raw milk for about a year and a half…it started out at $6 a gallon, and is now up to $8…if its goes much higher, we will have to revert back to store bought milk…even organic will seem like a bargain ($5/gallon) after the raw, but it makes me sad…

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  23. Erica says

    Raw milk isn’t legal in our state, so we drink organic whole creamtop milk from Trader joes. At least it’s not homogenized.

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    Heidi Reply:

    Wow–I think our closest Trader Joe’s is about 2 hours away. I have never been in one, but EVERYBODY and his brother talks it up. Should get my cooler and head that way! LOL!

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  24. Kate says

    I am thankful that raw milk is legal in Maine–I support everyone’s right to choose their food sources.

    However, in my family we drink water and tea, and my two year old occasionally drinks coconut milk.

    The cartons may say that the milk is free of growth hormones, but (for us), the fact remains that cow’s milk is full of cow hormones that were meant for growing baby cows.

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  25. Laurie H. says

    There are dairys that sell non-homogenized milk that is pasteurized for a very short time at a low temperature. I can get one here in Ohio at Whole Foods from Snowville Creamery. It’s what we drank until we found a source for raw.

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  26. says

    I buy growth hormone-free whole milk…would love to buy raw or organic but it is not in the budget. I mostly just use it to make yogurt, which we eat about a gallon a week. Lately the kids have been really into drinking it. I make coconut milk for baking needs and should try making yogurt from it…just haven’t yet! My first choice would be raw goat milk, but at $7/gallon it’s not n the budget! Someday hopefully, we’ll be able to milk our own!

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  27. says

    Our budget doesn’t allow for anything but regular store bought milk (and that pretty much solely for cooking/making yogurt). I’d love to have the option of raw milk, but it’s illegal in our state, so until then I’m hoping for change … and more wiggle room in our budget ;-)

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  28. Karen Dee says

    I need milk to make my kefir. I drink 1/2 half a cup about every other day. Here in Michigan seems you need to buy a share of a cow or goat and I can’t afford that so I buy Organic Valley or Full Circle 2 % at the store. For cereal and cooking I use Almond or Coconut milk.
    Isn’t it said that whole milk, as God made it, is better for you than 1/2% or skim milk?

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  29. says

    I am so thankful for our family milk cow!! She just calved and we are going to raise her heifer calf up for a second milk cow so we can stagger calving and NEVER be out of milk. Our whole family dreads those 8 weeks of being without milk! Now we just have to find a local calf to buy so we have beef for next year :-)

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  30. Betty Sievert says

    I have enjoyed your cookbook so much. I appreciate all the effort that you and your family put into it. However, I have a big problem. I was just diagnosed with diabetes. No white flour, white sugar, and some veggies are off limits also. By checking my blood sugar levels frequently I have discovered that I am hyper-sensitive to carbs, so I have had to go through a big change with my diet. I have taken some of your recipes and used soy and almond flour instead, and almond milk for regular. The results are not the same, but ok. If you have suggestions I would really appreciate it. I have a nutri mill, so once I get better organized I will grind my own almonds.

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    Heidi Reply:

    Betty–FWIW, I am non-diabetic, and still am hyper-sensitive to some grains. It probably doesn’t make a huge deal with my sugar, since I don’t have the same issues as you do, but I notice bloating, stomach “ick” (not “sick”–just not well), and weight gain every time.

    Have you looked into the benefits of coconut oil and diabetes? I have heard about it–we use tons of coconut oil–but our reasoning was related to my husband’s high cholesterol. Maybe it isn’t useful, but you could check. :)

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    Betty Sievert Reply:

    Thanks, I already use it, but will
    certainly appreciate ant other
    suggestions.

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    Carolyn Stutz Reply:

    Hi – I hate to tell you this, but you can’t grind almonds in your Nutrimill. In fact, no nuts that I’m aware of because of the high oil content. You can, however, grind them in a coffee grinder. It’s takes a bit of work, but it’s worth it. Well, it is for me. I boil the almonds for a minute, then slip off the skins, let them dry (have used my dehydrator to make sure there’s no moisture) then put maybe 1/4 cup in the grinder and grind away. Never have all the almonds been ground so I throw it in a fine-mesh sieve and start the process all over. The ones that don’t grind the first time I throw in again – eventually, it all becomes a beautiful almond meal :) As I said, it takes work, but it’s worth it for me. I would just hate to see you ruin your Nutrimill.

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    Betty Sievert Reply:

    Oh, my, thank you so much! I
    haven’t yet used my nutri mill,
    and would have been so upset
    with myself if I had ruined it.
    It’s so new I haven’t yet read
    the instructions. You have saved
    me a bunch of money. But what in
    the world am I going to use this
    beautiful piece of machinery for
    now? I bought it before I was
    diagnosed with diabetes in order
    to make lovely bread, which I can’t
    eat now.

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    Carolyn Stutz Reply:

    Did I read that you can’t eat bread at all? or rather, can’t eat grains? I don’t know why I’m having a hard time finding that comment. Since I can’t find the comment I thought I’d read, I don’t know how you respond to whole wheat. If it’s just white flour then obviously whole wheat can be ground. The Nutrimill will grind other grains – rice, beans, amaranth… they’re all listed in the manual – and they can all be used to make bread – just not the kind yu were originally planning :) Just make sure you use the right setting (i.e. “11:00″ on the bottom dial for rice) Oh, you can grind popcorn to make cornmeal – yummy. Don’t fret, you don’t have to send it back or sell it :) Read the manual – it’ll help. If nothing else, call the company where you bought it (I got mine through Pleasant Hill Grain – they’re very helpful) and ask questions for clarification.
    I hope I helped some. I know that your journey can be difficult as you learn what you can and can’t eat, but it’s not impossible. Look at it as an adventure into learning about new foods. God bless you!

  31. Betty Sievert says

    I should have said that I can’t tolerate wheat products at all, not just white flour, and can’t tolerate sugar in any form. I’m trying to use Truvia, but even though the results are okay, I don’t like artificial sweeteners. I always fed my family a whole foods diet, but now I need to make the necessary changes for my diabetes, I just haven’t found all the sources I need yet. It’s a journey!

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    Carrie Reply:

    I’ve had type 1 diabetes for 14 years. I’ve tried all the natural sweeteners (honey,agave, sucanat,etc.) and found that the best one for me is coconut sugar. It seems to cause less of a peak in my blood sugar. Give it a try!

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    Betty Sievert Reply:

    Thanks, Carrie. Is coconut sugar available at Whole Foods or on-line?

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    Carrie Reply:

    I order mine from amazon. i like the Madhava brand.

    Carolyn Stutz Reply:

    okay, HERE’S the comment I was looking for! ack! well, as I said above, the Nutrimill will grind other grains. Actually, it’s almost better that you haven’t used it yet cause it’s not contaminated with wheat. See? a silver lining!

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    Betty Sievert Reply:

    Thanks, Carolyn. I’m so hyper
    sensitive to carbs that any
    thing made from wheat sends my
    blood sugar over the top. I
    haven’t experimented with rice yet.
    And I don’t know about cornmeal
    yet, but my, grinding popcorn
    to make cornmeal! Isn’t that ducky!
    Can’t wait to try that! I’m trying
    to not look at what I can’t have
    but to look at what new things I can have.

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  32. Anna Rose says

    We have a fridge full of choices to fit each of us!

    My 3 1/2 y/o daughter and I drink raw milk that we are fortunate enough to get from a family nearby that lets us “buy” it from them at a suggested donation of $4 a gallon, which as I am seeing, is CHEAP! The 2 cups or so of cream on a gallon is worth it since whipping cream from the store is ~$4 for the same amount!

    My husband doesn’t like the slight “farm” taste, especially as he has done electrical work in dairy’s before and can’t separate the taste from the cow smell so he drinks D milk from the store. I grew up on raw milk so the slight smell/taste is not as big of a deal for me.

    My almost 2 y/o drinks Almond Breeze Unsweetened Almond Milk as he is allergic to dairy and we supplement with Calcium Lactate, which is the most readily absorbed form of calcium, and is doing well. Soy milk (we thought we’d try it as another option) is a no-no that we found out the hard way-really bad eczema on his forearms and calves just hours after drinking it and really bad stomach-ache and sleepless nights for four nights until I did my research. We are cutting out all soy due to his allergy, but from what I read, the forms of it that we have available aren’t good for us anyway. I just found out that there is unsweetened coconut milk so I may try that for him next if I can find it.

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  33. kim t. says

    When i buy milk for cooking or the kids, we buy from Dungeness Valley Creamery. If I’m buying for myself, I am trying to wean off of skim milk which I love, so It’s been a difficult transition to 1%, and I don’t drink that much. Someday I hope to be able to get myself to drink the raw whole stuff. :)

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  34. Shelley says

    My daughter and son-in-law own a dairy farm. It is not certified organic, but the cows are raised well without growth hormones and antibiotics and grass fed most of the year. My granddaughter has been raised on raw milk. She’s almost two and has never been sick with anything. In fact my daughter and son-in-law haven’t either in a very, very long time, and she says she’s pretty sure it’s partly because of the raw milk.

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    Heidi Reply:

    While my sister and her husband milked cows, their first kids NEVER had cavities. Later they went out of cows and the younger kids had a lot more dental issues because they had no contact with raw milk. They found a source of underground raw milk, but that eventually died off. None of us have raw milk because our state doesn’t allow it. For awhile, I had heard about different locations that sold underground, but it was still 2 or more hours away. :(

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  35. Crystal says

    We buy whole organic pasturized, but not homogenized milk (Strauss or Trader Joe’s)still so good! Strauss is grass-fed, in glass bottles. For yogurt: whole organic Strauss or Trader Joe’s.

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  36. Birdie says

    It’s illegal to sale or buy raw milk where we are. WAAAAA! I can’t even go and get some from diary farmers down the road. They could be put out of business. We did have some at a meal there and it was sooooo yummy! Organic milk from the store is a fortune. We just have 2% on our cereal and cooking.

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  37. Jen says

    We just drink water. I feel that if you can’t get raw grass fed then its not worth it. There’s no nutrients in pasteurized milk that you can’t get in other food sources. We occasionally use coconut milk in recipes.

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  38. Jennifer says

    No raw milk available here. I finally bit the bullet and bought whole organic last week for$6 a gallon. To mitigate the extra cost I mixed two parts milk to one part water to make three gallons from the two I bought. Since we were drinking 1% before, the taste is still richer and I can swallow the extra cost, since it’s not as cringe-worthy. We only use milk or cooking and on cereal so this works for us!

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  39. Aimee says

    When our cows are being dried up we get the best quality milk we can and then culture it- yogurt, kefir, etc. I feel that at least we’re adding in tons of pro-biotics so it’s better for us.

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  40. Heidi says

    I am amazed at a neighboring dairy farm. THEY don’t even drink their own milk–they buy from the store. They are so concerned about getting sick from germs from the bulk tank–YET they aren’t concerned about the added growth hormones in milk from the store. Although it is easier to find milk that doesn’t have added hormones in our area, the neighbor doesn’t even seek that out. She figures it isn’t a big deal, and she should support the fact that they add growth hormones. Gross. They just put up a hog barn–we are in one of the leading hog-producing states–but factory farming is obviously not a big deal to them. :(

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  41. Laura says

    Here in PA, we are so thankful to be able to get raw milk, straight from the farm, for $3.50 per gallon. It’s such a blessing. I’m sure it is keeping us healthier. The cream on top isn’t quite rich enough to make butter or whip, but it’s great for recipes like Laura’s Creamy Chicken & Rice!!

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  42. Mark says

    Raw milk or bust. Organic milk is UHT, can’t even call it milk.

    In no way does it take a 2nd mortage to get raw milk. It’s a bargain at any price for the nutrition it provides.

    These little decisions to compromise stack up and it’s quite a slippery slope. Before you know it, you’re back to where you started.

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    Rebecca Reply:

    Raw milk and milk products like cheese are illegal to sell in WI and many other states. Some of us do the best with what we can. Thanks

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Mark, while I am always open to readers sharing their thoughts, even if they disagree with me, I do appreciate it if you keep it kind and positive. No need to discourage others about their choices! Everyone has different circumstances, and I’m quite confident that decisions like this one are not sending me (or others) down a slippery slope. :)

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    Heidi Reply:

    I don’t think you understand everybody’s circumstances, so you are not one to judge us. First of all, I am in a state where it is illegal. I am a firm believer in the health benefits of dairy, but in your tone it sounds like I should just skip all dairy then?

    You also don’t know everybody’s finances. If I chose public school over homeschooling, then I’d have that extra income, but I personally would feel taking the public school router (for our family) IS a slipperly slope (due to our lousy district). The next person may feel eating ANY grains (or meat, or dairy, or chocolate chips) is falling down the slippery slope. I would say most of us are doing what we feel is best for our family and our situation. I bet if you laid out your entire life, some of us could find where your slope is going, but we probably wouldn’t. You didn’t need to judge everybody here.

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  43. Angelia Johnson says

    I have a bladder disease so fresh milk could cause me a great deal of pain. I even tried cheese before from fresh milk and was in bed for 2 weeks. It can be had in Washington State but it is harder to find and must be purchased in specialty stores. I wish I was able to try it but can’t.

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  44. Jamie Garcia says

    Ew that store stuff is so gross (pun intended), I cannot stand the plastic-y taste! Plus it’s “ultra” pasteurized, blech. But I’m guessing you cannot taste it if you are only cooking with it? Maybe I’m just crazy like my hubby likes to joke? (he’d better just be joking I do the cooking!)

    But I understand completely! We get ours under the table for a $5/gallon “donation” from a friend. Before that I was paying $7/gallon for “legal” raw milk and “illegally” taking it across state lines from 30 minutes away. In our state people were recently prosecuted by the Feds and “USDuh” for drinking their own cows milk that was milked by a farmer they paid to keep it for them (otherwise known as “cow shares”). The gov’t made me into a criminal, so I guess you now know the lengths I will go to get raw, grass fed, local milk. (PS our farmer’s cows also get cow feed as supplements, which I do not agree with, but it’s also a compromise! I understand compromise!)

    btw our family of 4 (Daddy plus two little girls and me who is expecting in Sept) drinks 4 gallons a week, and we usually go without the last day (esp if I make pudding or french toast for the freezer), how in the world with 5 huge man-boys and making all the yogurt/BM, etc do you only get away with 3 gallons!!?? lol

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  45. says

    regular milk…we go through 7 – 8 gallons a week, so can’t afford even organic…we did get Raw from TX for a little while with a co-op, but it is much more expensive here in the DC area…so we just go regular…

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  46. Karen says

    We have been drinking raw ever since we realized that our youngest son was sensitive to processed milk and it was causing him to have constant ear problems. He can tolerate the raw just fine and hasn’t had an ear problem since. We got raw milk in WI, MI and now CA, but at $18 a gallon in CA I almost fell over the first time I went to buy it in the store! Get it from a farmer now to save our budget! Love homemade buttermilk and ice cream…so yummy!

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    Nia Hanna Reply:

    Hello, I’m curious what farmer that would be. I’d love to look up a farmer in southern CA to purchase my raw milk from. Like Laura we drink about 3 gallons per week, plus use another gallon or so for cooking and yogurt and kefir. I’d love not to have to spend $60 + on milk alone. That $18 per gallon is definitely a steep price.

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    Amanda B Reply:

    You can find raw milk retailers and farmers anywhere in the US here: http://www.realmilk.com/real-milk-finder/

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  47. Lena says

    We have been drinking raw milk for a few years now. Reciently the farm I buy my milk from had a fire and is not milking at the moment. But there is another farm close to me that sales it at $5.00 a gallon so I have started buying from them. Didn’t see it much of a problem since they are the once housing the other farms cows for the time being. I love raw milk!!

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  48. Christina says

    Goat milk–at our house we have our own milker goat. She milks about a gallon a day. What we do when she dries off in October and we have baby kids to feed in March is we basically don’t drink milk at all. It’s not that hard. However I am hoping to get another doe so she can freshen in the fall so we have a steady milk supply.

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