Wash Your Potatoes in the Dishwasher

The look on my boys’ faces were priceless.

I mean, when I give out orders like, “Fold and put away the laundry” or “Go clean the bathrooms” I usually just get a routine shrug, nod, and a big high five.  (Just kidding.  My kids don’t like cleaning the bathrooms enough to warrant a high five.)  But when I asked my boys to fill the dishwasher with potatoes, they thought maybe I’d finally lost my mind.

Apparently they hadn’t read the same tip I had that stated that if you need to scrub a large amount of potatoes, you could let your dishwasher do the work for you.  Mom, crazy?  Naw, just efficient.

(Okay, yeah, and a little crazy too.)

Recently, after ordering 50 pounds of potatoes from our food co-op, I had my boys put about a third of them into the dishwasher.  I ran the load, without soap, and had tons of potatoes ready to bake and make into Homemade Hashbrowns.

Wash Potatoes in the Dishwasher

I just wanted to share that tip in case you’re feeding a bunch of people for the holidays, in case you want to make Homemade Hashbrowns

Or in case you wanted to make your kids giggle when you ask them to do a chore.  ;)

Side Note:  I typically bake a full roasting pan full of potatoes (with lid on) for about an hour and a half at 350°.  Or easier still, I’ll bake them in a crock pot.  Read full instructions here.

Ever washed potatoes in the dishwasher?

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Comments

  1. Sandy (aka Grannie) says

    Q: What temperature is your d/w water; didn’t they get partially cooked? I like the idea; I just can’t wrap my mind around it………. :)

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    They get a tiny bit steamed, but not much. I still bake them for just as long as normal.

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  2. Stacey says

    Yes, I have washed potatoes in the dishwasher! I worked in the kitchen at church, and about once a month we had a “potato bar”, so we washed several loads of potatoes in the dishwasher before wrapping them with foil and baking them.

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  3. Nicole says

    Wondering if the cooking time will be reduced any? Since the dishwasher temp would likely steam cook them a bit.

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    It does steam them a tiny bit, but since I tend to bake so many potatoes at once, I still bake them for 1 1/2 hours.

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  4. Vicki says

    I’ve never washed potatoes in the dishwasher but I do remember my mother washing carrots in the washing machine.

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    Carol Reply:

    Inez always had a huge garden. One time I was at her house and she opened her washing machine to show me the load of potatoes she had just washed (cold water wash, I’m sure, since she was just as frugal as she was labor efficient!). :-)

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  5. Deb says

    We tried this, it works for baked, but does not work if you are making them into french fries, must be the precooking, not sure, but my fries weren’t right when I did this…………..

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  6. Kimberlee says

    I had a friend who put her rolls in the dishwasher to raise. She turned it to the dry cycle and put a bowl of water on the bottom rack. She had the lightest, fluffiest rolls…

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    Cathie Reply:

    I put mine on the counter on top of the dishwasher, then run a load. I have to say, I get the best rise this way!

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  7. Naomi says

    I used to work in a school cafeteria and we once washed a huge amount of potatoes in the dishwasher (it was one of those pass-thru kinds used in institutional settings, not the type used in homes). The ones we used right away were fine. However, they were cooked about 1/8″ beneath the skin, and we discovered this several days later when preparing some of them for lunch and they were spoiled. You wouldn’t leave cooked potatoes out at room temperature without expecting them to go bad, but that is exactly what we were essentially doing! So maybe if you can control the temp of your dishwasher I’d suggest running them through at a low temperature. I don’t have a dishwasher and am not familiar with them, so this is a statement made in ignorance: run them through just a rinse cycle or something, hopefully with a low temperature. You just want to clean them, not partially cook them.

    [Reply]

    cindi Reply:

    If your dishwasher doesn’t have a way to control the temperature then you can make it use cold water by making sure there’s no hot water in the tank. Do it right after everybody takes their shower and you’ve done all the laundry that uses hot or warm water & make sure to not use the heat dry setting.

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  8. Jill says

    Hey, whatever works! When my gramma needed loads of stale bread for Thanksgiving stuffing she used to lay out bread on cookie sheets and stuff them under the beds for a day or two to harden. When my great gram made her Easter donuts, you’d walk in and see trays of doughballs rising up and down all the staircases. I host Chrismas, and I stick the wine bottles, soda cans and juice bottles out in the snow to chill which also saves on refridgerator space. Sometimes you’ve gotta innovate!

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  9. Mary Beth Elderton says

    This is absolutely brilliant! Wow! Thank you for this tip–it is just about to come in real handy for holiday cooking :D

    [Reply]

  10. Nora says

    Ok, question….what about washing in the dishwasher and then peeling and dicing for pressure canning? Would that work?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I don’t know for sure, but I’m guessing it probably would. :)

    [Reply]

  11. Rosemyrose says

    I can’t see this as being a good idea from an energy or time saving standpoint. I can’t imagine it taking much less time, water, or electricity to just wash them in the sink. By the time you got them all into the dishwasher without falling through the racks you could have them finished being scrubbed in the sink using no electricity, not to mention less water being used, and your hands would be clean to boot!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    My boys had them loaded in the dishwasher in about 1 minute since they all worked together. It would have taken them/me about 45 minutes to stand at the sink washing 20 pounds of potatoes. We didn’t have any trouble with them falling through because these were some pretty big taters! :)

    [Reply]

  12. says

    My husband works in the University Food Service industry, so has LOTS of experience with large quantity cooking. We have used the commercial dishwasher to wash potatoes when we had to feel A LOT of folks. It is even faster than the home dishwasher. Works great!

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  13. Nicole says

    Okay…washed a bunch in the dishwasher, came back and read more comments and now I’m worried about them spoiling since they are errr…partially cooked…? Any problems there you think? Do I need to store them in the fridge now?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    You may want to store them in the fridge. I bake, shred, and freeze mine right away, so I’ve never actually thought about it. Fridge would probably be best just in case!

    [Reply]

  14. says

    The last two years, when we’ve dug our potato crop for the year, we washed all the tiny ones in our old twin-tub washer (spin basket no longer works, so we bought a front-loader). It worked great to get them clean; they just needed a quick rinse afterwards. They don’t keep, though; the first year we had to throw away most of them. The second year, we canned them! Wonderful convenience food. The second year, however, the motor was going out, so next time, I’m thinking about buying a toilet plunger and have boys wash them in a half-barrel by plunging them up and down. We’ll see if that works. I have six boys, infant to almost 13, so lots of man-power!

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  15. Lisa says

    I mentioned this idea to my husband, who said “no way!” Apparently, the dirt washes into the motor of the dishwasher and will ultimately result in an expensive repair bill…

    [Reply]

    cindi Reply:

    I don’t see how the potatoes would have more dirt than the dirty food-caked dishes that get run through the dishwasher at least 3 times a week if you do dishes every other day. How does the dirt from potatoes hurt the motor when food particles going through it on a regular basis do not?

    [Reply]

    Lala Reply:

    My guess is that her husband is concerned because it’s actual dirt on the potatoes, which usually includes sand, not just good particles like the dirty dishes would have.

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  16. Janet says

    You can also cook fish in the dishwasher. I remember years ago the late actor Vincent Price talking about seasoning the fish, wrapping it in foil and putting it in the top rack of the dishwasher. He said the advantage was no fishy smell in the house and the fish always turned out perfect.

    [Reply]

  17. Lala says

    My guess is that her husband is concerned because it’s actual dirt on the potatoes, which usually includes sand, not just food particles like the dirty dishes would have on them. . . .

    [Reply]

  18. Naomi says

    Do I need to run the jet dry out first? I don’t think I would want my potatoes washed with jet dry on them. Thanks!

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    LindseyforLaura@HHM Reply:

    Yes! Good call, I would wait until all detergents and cleaning agents are out of the machine! :)

    [Reply]

  19. Lori says

    My dishwasher is ruined since I’ve tried this! I’ve dismantled and cleaned the trap and interior bits and after six washes I still have loads of grit everywhere. It is AWFUL!! Further, it didn’t get the potatoes completely clean and I still had to wash them by hand! SO incredibly sad and disappointed!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Super bummer! So sorry to hear that happened!

    [Reply]

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