Oven Roasted Tomato Sauce – easy!

When you make tomato sauce on the stove-top, it takes several hours, plus you have to stir the sauce quite often to keep it from scalding on the bottom.  No biggie – I’ve done it this way forever and it hasn’t killed me yet.  But guess what?  My friend Anne just figured out a way to make tomato sauce in the oven and it’s even easier!!!!  (Maybe some of you  have been doing it this way all along and it’s only new to Anne and me?)

If you’ve read my stove-top tomato sauce directions, you already know that I do not peel my tomatoes nor do I take the seeds out.  I just blend up the tomatoes and call it good.  Some might call this lazy.  Shucks, I call this lazy.  But this is one instance where being lazy works fine.  You are very welcome to take off the skins and take out the seeds if you prefer.

I never measure or weigh my tomatoes, but in doing a little searching on the internet, I find that it takes 35-45 pounds of tomatoes to make 7 quarts of sauce.  How many tomatoes equals one pound?  It totally depends on the tomato.  What kind of tomatoes can you use to make sauce?  Whatever kind you want.  We always plant a variety of tomatoes and throw them all together into our sauce.

Because tomatoes are very acidic (especially heirloom tomatoes), I’m not terribly concerned about adding lemon juice to my sauce.  However, if you feel more comfortable adding lemon juice for safety, you’ll want to use about 2 Tablespoons in each quart jar.

Now, how to make Oven Roasted Tomato Sauce:

First wash your tomatoes (unless you enjoy the grit of soil from your garden…mmm).

Next, cut up your tomatoes and throw them into a roasting pan or any large baking dish.  I usually cut my larger tomatoes into fourths and my smaller tomatoes in half.

Place the container of tomatoes (uncovered) into a 350° oven for about 1 1/2 hours or until the tomatoes are all shrivelled up and are floating in their own juices.

Run them through a strainer so that all you have left is the shrivelled tomatoes.

Place the tomatoes in a blender until smooth.  Or better yet!!  Run them through a Victorio!!!

Can them in a water bath (you can read more about this process here) for 25-30 minutes.

Are you a canner?  Have you ever tried making tomato sauce this way?

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Comments

  1. Colleena says

    You can disregard my question as I just saw a post where you answered my question about what to do with the liquid you strain off after baking.
    Thanks again,
    Colleena

    [Reply]

  2. Amara says

    Would it be possible for you to tell me the post that Colleena is referring to? I was also wondering what to do with the liquid. There is so much. Don’t want to waste it :)

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    Katy Reply:

    Amara I answered below.

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  3. Katy says

    Amara, she is referring to the older comments where she said you can save the juice and can it to use in soups if you want to.

    [Reply]

  4. Jennie says

    Hi Laura,

    I found your apple pie filling recipe last year, tried it and it tastes great! I did have a problem during the canning process in that about half of the jars over flowed after I took them out of the canner. I made several batches and it happened each time. Any thoughts on what may be causing it? I am getting ready to can more apple pie filling this year, and am hoping to avoid the same result.

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Hmm, strange and frustrating after all that work! The only thing I can think of is that maybe the jars are a little too full to begin with?? :)

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    Country Girl in the City Reply:

    I had this with canning apple pie filling last year. I processed the jars for the time needed. Then I removed the cannner from the heat. I left the jars in the canner for about 10 to 15 min for things to cool down a bit. I found that the over flowing was not nearly as bad this way.

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    Jennie Reply:

    Thanks so much, I will try this.

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    Leesa Reply:

    I would say that either your liquid is too thick or you are boiling the water too hard when you are water bathing. Your contents are over heating and boiling out of the jars. I often have this problem when I can applesauce and have found that I just have to simmer the after putting the jars in.

    Jennie Reply:

    Thanks Leesa,

    I will simmer instead of boil this year. I also found that leaving the jars in the canner for the 10-15 minutes helped – via the suggestion from Country Girl in the City

  5. Margi Hansen says

    Hello
    You have a beautiful website. Do you ever pressure can? Any time you’re using foods that are low acidic (basically anything except fruit & tomatoes) you need to pressure can them. Also, when you add low acid vegetables to tomato, like adding onions to sauce or as when you suggested blending zuchinni
    in with your tomato sauce you need to pressure can it. A good resource is the USDA canning guide.

    Forgive me if I missed this information on your website.
    Margi Hansen

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I don’t pressure can, just water bath with food items that are safe for that. (tomatoes, apples, peaches and pears) :) I need to edit my post and take out the part about throwing in other veggies because you are right, I have learned since writing this that water bath isn’t safe for that.

    [Reply]

  6. Margi Hansen says

    Thank you for answering Laura! I’ve canned for years, grew up in a “canning household” my Mom did every imaginable thing, except meat, used the pressure canner as much as the WBC. However I never do anything that needs to be pressure canned, because I’m afraid of it!!

    [Reply]

  7. Sarah says

    Laura, can you also freeze this sauce?

    [Reply]

    joanna n. Reply:

    i’m curious about this as well…

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Yep!

    [Reply]

  8. Brenda says

    Totally impressed with the results of this method! I have followed your directions for applesauce and tomato sauce for a few years now… when you got the victorio, I had to have one too! Today was my first experience with roasted tomato sauce and the victorio. Very easy and perfectly yummy! Thanks so much!

    [Reply]

  9. says

    I wonder, can you use previously frozen whole tomatoes for this?

    [Reply]

    Heather D. Reply:

    Also wondering… Have several bags in the freezer, want to make sauce and then freeze it with the cooked meat and spices so it’s ready to go. Wondering if it would not taste good done that way? Anyone tried it?

    [Reply]

    Charity Reply:

    I found a website that shares how the lady did it, and she said it tasted great!

    http://hickeryhollerfarm.blogspot.com/2010/10/canning-frozen-tomatoes.html

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    LindseyforLaura@HHM Reply:

    It should work great using frozen tomatoes!

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  10. says

    I make a similar sauce but I coat the tomatoes in olive oil, salt and pepper and also roast chunked up peppers and onions and add to the pureed sauce however, my sauce, has to be pressure canned. I have also added onions, green chiles and cumin to the pureed sauce for my own enchilada sauce. This too, MUST be pressure canned. It must such a rich thick sauce that doesn’t need to be cooked down!

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  11. Rachel says

    I’ve never done any canning, so forgive me if this is a silly question. I usually make my spaghetti sauce by simply adding herbs and spices to a store-bought can of tomato sauce since we don’t like chunky spaghetti sauce. If I were to can my own tomato sauce as you’ve done above, could I add the spices before canning so that it would be all ready to go or would I need to add them when I go to use it?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Yep, you can certainly add them while making your sauce and can it that way!

    [Reply]

  12. Valerie says

    I have been canning by putting all my jars on a cookie sheet and putting them in the oven at 275 for about 1/2 hour. I pull them out and listen to the beautiful popping. I’ve been doing this for 2 years now and it works beautifully. I learned this from a woman who has been canning for 30 years!!!

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    Kim Reply:

    This is an old method that has been proven to be unsafe. You should always follow the most up to date method in order to be safe. Just because it seals doesn’t mean that it has been cooked for long enough or hot enough to kill the bacteria that will cause your food to spoil. The Ball Blue Book or the USDA Complete Guide to Home Canning. You can get them both at your local extension office.

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    Jane of all Trades Reply:

    This method isn’t safe, just because neither of you have gotten sick from this method dosen’t mean you won’t or can’t. It is very improtant to use safe canning methods even if they are a bit harder. Water bath canning and pressure canning are the only methods proven to be safe if done correctly.

    [Reply]

  13. Connie says

    Can you add green pepper,onion and garlic and still water bath can this?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    You’ll need to use a pressure cooker if you use additional non-acidic veggies like peppers and onion. :)

    [Reply]

  14. Christina says

    Hi Laura!! Thanks for this simple way to process tomatoes…starting it this morning. I do have one question: why do the tomatoes get strained after the roasting? Wouldn’t the juices from the tomatoes add extra liquid to the pureed skins?

    I do not have a lot of experience with canning so …just curious about this step. Thanks for any help and tips!

    Blessings,
    Christina

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    There is quite a bit of runny, watery liquid after roasting, which is why it’s best to strain it off. It’s much like another method I sometimes use, which is cooking it on the stovetop and waiting for several hours until after all the liquid has steamed off. Roasting it and pouring off the liquid saves the time of steaming it off on the stove – either way, the liquid separates and is not needed for smooth sauce.

    [Reply]

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