Mini Crustless Breakfast Quiches

crustless_quiche
You know how I mentioned that we go through a lot of eggs at our house? Six dozen last week to be exact.  This week I was able to get my hands on 11 dozen farm fresh eggs and I am so very excited. It’s obviously the simple things in life that make me happy…proven by the fact that having 11 dozen eggs available this week for my cooking pleasure has made me almost giddy.

What do we do with all those eggs you ask?  Well, there are six of us, five are male and four of those five male people can’t seem to get enough food right now. We also have extra people eating at our house quite often, so our six turns into eight or more on just about any given day. I bake a lot, so I stir them into whatever I’m baking. We easily go through an entire dozen for breakfast if I’m making scrambled eggs or a casserole, and more than a dozen if I make crepes. These Coconut Flour Muffins are incredible…and they take up quite a few eggs. And, I often put eggs in our smoothies or “milkshakes” for added protein and nutrients. (Again, let me reinforce that we ONLY eat them raw if they are organic, free range, farm fresh…otherwise I’m afraid of them.)

If I have lots of eggs available to me, I go for it and I don’t hold back! Eggs are brain food.  I pay between $2.00 and $2.50 for a dozen farm fresh eggs, depending on my source. For the quality of eggs I’m getting, I consider this to be a great price. So even though we go through a lot of eggs…what an economical source of nutrition!!! How else can I feed my family an entire meal for just over $2.00??? (Okay, yes, they eat fruit and stuff with their eggs…you see my point though, right?)

If you haven’t tried our Easy Breakfast Casserole, please go get yourself some eggs and try it. It’s the simplest little breakfast casserole I’ve ever made and my family eatsthe whole pan. Actually…they don’t eat the pan. Hungry boys though they are, they do have their limits.

I  have now adapted the Easy Breakfast Casserole recipe to become an easy, make-ahead Mini Crustless Breakfast Quiche recipe. You can make these and serve them fresh, or you can bake them the night before and re-warm them in the oven the next morning for breakfast. You can even bake them and freeze them to have available for future grab and go meals. You can make them for lunch or brunch. These little quiches are super versatile!

Mini Crustless Breakfast QuicheYum

12 eggs
3/4 cup heavy cream
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
1  cup shredded cheese (I use white cheddar, but you can use whatever cheese you want!)

Begin your quiches by whisking together the eggs, cream, salt and cheese in a large mixing bowl.   Sprinkle in any “add in” ingredients you wish (a total of 1 cup of add-ins). Stir them around with a fork.  Scoop mixture into 24 well buttered regular sized muffin tins. Bake in a 350° oven for 20-30 minutes, or until the middle of each quiche doesn’t jiggle.

Add In Ideas:

Cooked sausage (I have a wonderful recipe for turkey sausage here.)
Chopped ham
Chopped and cooked bacon
Leftover baked potatoes, cut into chunks or shredded into hashbrowns
Sauteed veggies
Raw spinach
Cooked chicken
Taco seasoned meat

Obviously, you can cut this recipe in half to make 12 regular sized muffins sized quiches!

Mini_Quiches_2

I’m curious, just because I’m fairly certain some of you might be shocked about our egg consumption…how many eggs does your family go through in a week?

Comments

  1. Jessica says

    We just had your breakfast casserole yesterday. It was very yummy and so easy! Thanks for the recipe!

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  2. Brenda says

    we have 5 hens who are laying 2-3 delicious eggs for us each day. I still buy 1 dozen eggs per week, so for my family of 6, on average, we are consuming 2.5×7=17.5+12=29.5 so, about 2 1/2 dozen for us!

    Today was the first day ever to get 4 eggs… 4×7=28… maybe I can quit buying that extra dozen soon!

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  3. Tutti says

    We go through 7 dozen a week and I only have 3 kids (7,5,4 years old). My husband eats a lot, too, but we eat the majority of them for breakfast. Fried eggs are the favorite around here.

    I pay between $4.59-6.00 per dozen, depending on if they are soy free or not!! $2.50 per dozen is unheard of!

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  4. Anna Whiteside says

    We go through anywhere from a half to one dozen a week for our family of four. Eggs from our local farms run about $4-$4.50 around here! I’ve been wanting some chickens, but we live in the city and, frankly, I think my husband would rather pay than clean up after them! ;)

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  5. Katie says

    For a family of 6, four kiddos (8, 6, 4, 1) we get 5 dozen eggs a week from a local source for $3.00 a dozen. Most times we are skimping on the eggs as it gets close to our weekly egg pick up, but every once in a while, like right now, I seem to be a couple dozen ahead of our egg “budget”. Guess it is time to do some baking!

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  6. Helen says

    Our family of four, uses 18 – 24 eggs in week. Our two boys are 3 and 1, so I am assuming our consumption will quickly be on the rise. I just got a new flock of hens (last ones were victims to a fox) and will have our own eggs in the next few weeks here!

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  7. says

    We use about 10 a week, there are on average 4 of us here, plus the hounds, who sometimes get one as a treat! DH is diabetic, so he likes them as a snack in the evenings. We recently found a new lady to buy from at $3.25 Canadian, whihc is at least $1.25 less than the store for free range. We aren’t allowed chickens here, but are seriouslly considering illegal ones!

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  8. Sharon says

    Anyone can feel free to chime in on this one. What dairy-free option could you use to replace the heavy cream? I was thinking coconut milk, but it might give the dish more of a coconutty flavor. I know nothing beats the taste of the heavy cream, but allergies prohibit using it.

    Thanks,
    Sharon

    [Reply]

    Jen Reply:

    Can your family have soy or almond? Those might make good subs.

    Otherwise I’d actually try just leaving out the cream altogether, maybe thin with a little water. I’ve made similar dishes before without using cream/milk/etc and they were fine.

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    As Jen mentioned, this recipe would work just fine without the cream!

    [Reply]

    Sharon Reply:

    I’m using the specific carb diet from Elaine Gottschall’s book Breaking the vicious cycle. You can use the homemade yogurt recipe she gives in place of the cream(her recipe has you keeps your yogurt at 100-110 degrees for 24 hours to get rid of all the lactose) or what I do when there isn’t time to make yogurt, is to use Lifeway Kefir instead. It’s 99% lactose free and is gluten free and works fine in all the recipes I’ve tried it in when dairy is called for! I haven’t made these quiches yet but I’m about to!
    And to answer Laura’s question, we are a family of 3 and easily go through 2 to 2 1/2 dozen eggs a week. :)

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  9. Heather Schilling says

    We have chickens and get around 2dz per day from them. Since we have so many, we don’t really pay attention to how many we use. We sell eggs for $3.00/dozen (Tulsa,OK area).
    Heather

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  10. Daphne says

    We go through about 1 1/2 dozen a week BUT it just keeps going up. I found out this morning that my five year old loves breakfast burritos. He ate three large tacos at dinner so I’m assuming he could two or three burritos for breakfast if I let him. My husband isn’t a big breakfast eater but when we eat brunch together on Saturdays, I go through eight eggs for one meal for four people. I have a feeling I’ll be buying a lot more eggs in the years to come.

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  11. Stacie says

    We go through 12-18 a week on average for 4 of us. $2.50/dz???? Wow! If I want local, farm fresh eggs from happy chickens, I’m looking at $4-5/dz.

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  12. Nicole B says

    If I’m making breakfast burritos for the freezer or if I’m baking I’ll use more, but for the most part we only go through a dozen every other week. Maybe it will increase after this recipe! It looks yummy! I try to get eggs from local farmers if they have them available. I pay between $2.50 and $3.00 for a dozen. A year ago, I had to drive 30 minutes to get some. Now I have one place that is 7 minutes away and one that is 5 minutes away!!!! I hope people are moving towards more direct sources of food.

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  13. Dee Jarvis says

    We use 2-3 dozen a week for 4 adults, but 1 of them is allergic to eggs :/. That has been a harder adjustment than going GF!

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  14. says

    I’m getting about 3 dozen eggs a week from my 7 hens, so we eat them all! I would love to get more chickens, eggs are awesome! My little one’s skin is really clearing up now that we are avoiding wheat, dairy, soy and coconut (not sure which is the culprit yet). Also, I’ve been bulking her up on probiotics (giving her 20x what I had been doing!). How’s your little guy?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Thanks for asking. He’s not better and I’m discouraged. But, it’s still only been 3 1/2 weeks.

    [Reply]

    Sharon Reply:

    Laura,

    Have your ever heard of Hazelaid? My friend swears by them for healing
    skin issues, and many other ailments. You might check out their
    website. http://www.hazelaid.com It tells all about the neckaces and
    precisely how they work. Oh, and don’t worry, you can get boyish
    necklaces. :o)
    Sharon

    [Reply]

    Jennifer Reply:

    Hi Laura,

    In dealing with my own son’s allergy issues, I learned that it
    can take many weeks for the overactive system to settle down
    and begin showing results.

    Also, I have had skin issues all my life, but simply growing
    older has helped! After I exited my mid-twenties, my skin just
    gradually got better. I’m in my 40’s now, and it’s about as normal
    as it can be. I know “mid-20’s” may seem like a long way off, but
    sometimes skin/allergy/autoimmune issues can get better with age.

    Hang in there! He’s blessed to have a mom who is helping him the
    way you do. It all may work yet!

    Jen

    [Reply]

  15. Priscilla F. says

    Dare I say I’m only paying $1.00/doz for my farm fresh eggs? Nothing beats them – not even sure I could raise my own for that! And oh the wonderful dishes that can be concocted out of farm fresh cream and eggs…

    [Reply]

    Heather Schilling Reply:

    You couldn’t raise your own for that! :D Not sure what part of the country you live in, but feed prices are up in Oklahoma.
    Heather

    [Reply]

  16. Nicole says

    Just out of curiosity, has anyone noticed a rise in cholesterol with all this egg consumption? My husband and I are both young, fit and eat healthy. We eat lots of whole dairy, little red meat, and we recently discovered our cholesterol is a tad high. =(

    [Reply]

    Rebekah Reply:

    High cholesterol is not necessarily a bad thing. As long as you’re consuming raw dairy and good sources of red meat and eggs, and not eating too many sugar foods or transfats, I wouldn’t worry about the cholesterol.

    Here is a very helpful, informative articles about cholesterol and the myths surrounding high cholesterol :
    http://westonaprice.org/modern-diseases/cardiovascular-disease/537-benefits-of-high-cholesterol?qh=YTo3OntpOjA7czo0OiJoaWdoIjtpOjE7czo1OiJoaWdocyI7aToyO3M6NjoiJ2hpZ2gnIjtpOjM7czoxMToiY2hvbGVzdGVyb2wiO2k6NDtzOjEzOiJjaG9sZXN0ZXJvbCdzIjtpOjU7czoxMjoiY2hvbGVzdGVyb2xzIjtpOjY7czoxNjoiaGlnaCBjaG9sZXN0ZXJvbCI7fQ%3D%3D

    [Reply]

    Heather Schilling Reply:

    My husband did some research on the differences between commercially produced eggs and the farm fresh, free-range that we have. He found that farm fresh eggs were much healthier. He was able to find helpful info through Mother Earth News.
    Heather

    [Reply]

    DreamingofSpring Reply:

    I do believe that free range organic eggs have less cholesterol an if they are fed OG flax the omega 3’s are much higher. Remember a large egg only has 70 calories and cholesterol is fat so there can’t be that much per egg. I just wouldn’t eat 5 per sitting as moderation is key . I agree that sat fat and cholesterol are a necessity to a healthy diet, it just depends on your sources. Our brains are made up of cholesterol and we wouldn’t be able to absorb many vitamins without halthy fats in our diet. I personally think that trans fats and high processed foods with fake ingredients and fake sugars are to blame for most of our dietary woes!! The Weston A. Price Foundation is an excellent source of information regarding healthy fats and healthy diet choices.

    [Reply]

  17. Shannon says

    My six year old daughter and I eat 1 1/2 dozen per week. The farm we buy eggs from recently went through a bad spell and didn’t have eggs for nearly 6 months. The first week I opened the fridge and saw a dozen on the shelf I literally danced! There’s nothing like a farm fresh egg, fried up and eaten on buttered sourdough toast. Mmmm. I know what’s for breakfast!!

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  18. Allison says

    We go through a lot of eggs too. It is the cheapest protein for us and they are fast and easy to prepare. We probably eat at least 20 eggs a week as a family (2 adults and one 21 month old) we buy them for 12 cents each and they are all free range and organic. Most of the eggs we get are only one or at the most two days old. We love the bright orange yokes. We even have fried egg sandwiches with lettuce and tomato for lunch sometimes when we are busy.

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  19. Joy G says

    I wish I could get eggs for that price! We’re averaging 2 dozen a week lately, but my two boys are still little. We pay just over $3 a dozen for regular store eggs, and the only local free range eggs at the farmers market here last summer were $5.50 a dozen!

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  20. says

    I have to admit I’m trying to figure out how a family of 6 goes through *only* a dozen eggs for breakfast with just some fruit on the side. We’d be starving! It’s just my husband, myself, and my 2-year-old son, and our standard breakfast is 9-10 scrambled eggs with a 1 lb. bag of cooked frozen veggies (we’re on the GAPS diet, so no grains). There are usually some veggies left (not always!), but eggs are promptly devoured. My 2yo can eat 3 by himself! We go through 5 dozen eggs in a week, so your egg consumption doesn’t shock me :-), if that makes you feel better. Hehe. And I would love to pay only $2/dozen for free-range eggs! In CT we are paying $4 when I can fit it in the budget. . . $1.50 for plain old battery eggs.

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  21. Darcy says

    We go through 4-5 dozen a week. We have 8 hens and only get about 3 eggs a day from them, so I end up buying 2-3 dozen a week for $2.50 from the local Amish. We could easily go through more eggs if I allowed my family to eat eggs as often as they want or if I baked as much as I wanted, but even at $2.50 we can’t afford to buy more eggs right now.

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  22. Jennifer says

    My husband and I go through about 1/2 to 1 dozen eggs per week. My 8 month old isn’t eating any solids yet. I am trying to eat more eggs because they are really good for you. We get free-range eggs from my cousin for $2 a dozen, but in the store organic free-range eggs are around $4.50 a dozen. I’m so glad you have such a great price for free-range eggs!

    [Reply]

  23. Sara B says

    My husband and I eat about 12-18 per week. We love eggs. There is nothing like a farm fresh egg fried up quick in a cast iron pan. Yum. My Dad has raised chickens for years and I used to get eggs for free…but now we live far, far away so I get them at the grocery store. I’m hoping to find a local dealer soon. Thanks for the great post!

    [Reply]

  24. Jill says

    I purchase 8 dozen from my Amish farmer for a great deal (2.50/dzn) every two weeks on our farm trips. This seems to be the perfect amount for our family of 4, and one more on the way. So I guess we average about 4 dozen/week. Love to hear from all the others – people think that 4 dzn/week is nuts but I don’t and it is good to see that I am not the only one!!

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  25. says

    I told my husband about y’all’s egg consumption and he laughed and said that would be us in a few years once we’ve had more children. We’re on day 13 of a grain-free, sugar-free diet, so our egg use has definitely gone up. I think we’ll go through 3 dozen eggs this week (we’re a family of 3). A lot of those coconut/almond flour recipes use a lot of eggs.

    [Reply]

  26. Sarah says

    We go through about 4 doz a week and maybe more if I do a lot of baking. I eat eggs everyday and as a family of 5 we all eat them about 3 times a week.
    On another note thank you for posting all your g-free recipes. We’ve been g-free/wheat free for awhile now, but I started reading your blog long before the intolerance presented. Of course I don’t read just for the recipes, but I missed trying all your yummy wheat recipes. Praying that this “experiment” is helping out your sweet little man. We are dealing with eczema issues here, but not as severely. We have now had to cut out dairy and eggs also for my littlest one. :( Food issues can be difficult at times, but I have also found it makes me even more aware than before what my family is putting into their bodies. :)
    Thanks!

    [Reply]

  27. says

    We only go through about 1/2 dozen eggs a week. My husband and one daughter don’t like to eat eggs, there are only 4 of us – no growing boys, and I don’t bake much. I see that all changing since I found your blog. Yesterday I made your breakfast cookies. Love them! Even soaked the oats the night before.

    My question is, what are the yummy looking muffins in the picture above next to the breakfast casserole?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Ah, those are Vanilla Muffins with Cinnamon Crumb Topping: http://heavenlyhomemakers.com/vanilla-muffins-with-cinnamon-crumb-topping :)

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  28. sarah says

    We go through about 7 dozen every week for our family of 7 (the baby eats her share of egg yolks too)!
    Thanks for the wonderful recipes!

    [Reply]

  29. Jessica K. says

    We use two dozen a week for our family of five (myself, my husband, 4 yr old, 2 yr old, and 2.5 month old who obviously doesn’t eat any yet!). We could easily go through 2.5 to 3 dozen a week, but I ration them! We pay about 2.00 to 2.50 a dozen for farm fresh eggs. I’m sure our consupmtion will increase as the children get older…hopefully we will have our own chickens by then!!

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  30. says

    We stink at eating eggs. Two of our kids WILL NOT eat them (one hasn’t for 8 years now). But, if the mini quiches are good freezer meal fodder then I’ll go make them right now because I have one little guy (7) who considered making scrambled eggs for a demonstration speech in his first grade class last week! He LOVE LOVE LOVES eggs! So much so that I bought him his own little egg skillet and spatula for his sixth birthday!

    [Reply]

    Alison Reply:

    You might want to try french toast to sneak in more eggs.
    Each piece of french toast soaks up one whole egg. It has
    been a great way to get our picky eaters to eat more eggs. I hope this helps.

    [Reply]

    Tara Reply:

    Thanks for the reply, Alison. The oldest can see through that trick,
    but I may be able to get away with it for the younger!

    [Reply]

  31. Dacia says

    We have a family of 6 – 2 adults and kids 10,8,6, and 4. I have to scramble up about 14 eggs to feed us a breakfast. We easily go through about 3-4 dozen a week. My husband works mornings, so he’s not here for breakfast 5 days of the week. We do have our own 45 laying hens, which give us an average of 3 dozen or so a day. We sell them for $2.00 a dozen here in southern NJ, thinking of upping it to $2.50 – cost for fresh ground feed at the local farm has gone up recently. :)

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  32. says

    My husband, ten month old son and I go through an average of two dozen eggs each week. And yes, the boy eats his fair share! Now when we do the maker’s diet (1-2 times/yr), we easily go through 4-5 dozen a week. Eggs are a staple on that diet!

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  33. says

    How do you defrost/reheat the quiches? I am really interested in making these for easy on-the-go bfast.

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I usually just put them into the oven frozen, warm them at 350 until they’ve heated through. OR, you can put them in the fridge overnight to thaw them first!

    [Reply]

  34. Lisa W says

    These look great! If frozen, what is the best way to reheat them? Thaw in the refrigerator first? Put in the oven? Microwave?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I just put them into the oven frozen, warm them at 350 until they’ve heated through. OR, you can put them in the fridge overnight to thaw them first!

    [Reply]

  35. says

    We only go through 1/2 a dozen a week, but it’s only my daughter and I. We have our own chickens and love the fresh eggs. They are very easy to take care of. If you have a garden you can throw their poop in there for fertilizer.

    [Reply]

  36. goatgirl says

    LAura,
    I just LOVE your site. It is so practical, simple, down-to-earth, clean and flexible. I found you awhile ago, but have added many of your recipes to our repertoire… You are a blog I check everyday. I appreciate that your voice carries over into your writing, too. It’s fun to have a friendly kitchen-companion.
    I, too, have four children and we raise chickens for meat and eggs. We can go through 4-6 dozen a week with eating and cooking. In fact, our go-to food when ill, besides chicken soup, are fried egg sandwiches! I love to watch the color of the yolk change with the season – now is so good for soft yolks with the bright orange color!
    Thanks again for bringing homemaking back to its true call: nurturing!

    [Reply]

  37. says

    I’m loving your gluten free series so far! My family of 4 goes through about 3 to 4 dozen eggs a week, depending on what recipes I’m making. I have two laying hens right now, which both gave me eggs almost everyday until recently. (One of them is setting right now.) I also buy farm fresh eggs from a friend, and pay $1.00 a dozen for them. I’m very lucky, because the whole foods market in my area sells them for $3 to $4 a dozen. Keep those yummy gluten free recipes coming!

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  38. Deanna says

    I saw in a FamilyFun magazine a lady that let her kids stir in their choice of add-ins to muffins. She filled the muffin tin with batter and they dropped a few berries, choc. chips or whatever in the individual cups, they then stirred it with a toothpick to mix it in. One could do that here too.

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  39. mary-grace says

    $6 a dozen for local eggs here (California). It is a killer!

    [Reply]

    Kristina Reply:

    I live in Devore (SoCal) and my neighbors sell their eggs for $3 a dozen!

    [Reply]

  40. Leanne says

    Wow! I guess we’re giving people a great deal. We sell our eggs for $1.50/dozen. We currently have 24 laying hens, and 2 dozen more to start laying in the fall. We try to save enough to supply our regular customers first, but with free reign our family will easily go through 6-7 dozen a week. We often make noodles which one batch takes 2 dozen egg yolks, then we use the white’s for angel food cake. We are a family of 7, soon to be 8. It seems to me when we have the eggs, we tend to eat them more often. Everyday if we figure in baking. West Michigan area.

    [Reply]

  41. Alison says

    Our family of 5 eats about 3-4 dozen eggs per week. We would use more if they were easier to get. I buy them through a co-op monthly and pay $3.25/dozen. People can’t believe how many eggs we eat. I feel so normal after reading this thread! :)

    [Reply]

  42. jerilyn says

    4 people and 3 dozen per week… we’re considering getting some hens, especially as our family grows

    [Reply]

  43. Dana says

    When do you add in the cheese for this recipe? Do you mix it in with the add-ins or put it on top like the casserole? These look delicious!

    [Reply]

  44. Erin says

    I go through a measly dozen eggs a week but mine are still young ( 1, 4 and 13). I do have a 13 year old son that can eat but he takes spells so he doesn’t eat mass quantities all the time.
    I wish I could buy farm fresh eggs for 2dollars. Mine cost $4 a dozen from my local coop.

    [Reply]

  45. Martha says

    We raise hens, and gather between 12 and 18 eggs every day, and we eat most of those eggs. I sell enough eggs to pay for the chicken feed.
    We have eggs most mornings for breakfast, either cooked straight up or in your wonderful breakfast casserole. Can’t wait to try the quiches!
    I also keep a container of hard boiled eggs in the fridge for quick snacks.

    [Reply]

  46. Amy says

    A dozen free range pastured eggs from our local farmer costs $5.25 a dozen! (Savannah, GA)

    [Reply]

    Tara Reply:

    HOLY CAMOLY!! I (along with others) charge $1 or $1.50 for free range eggs. WOW. (Ohio) I guess I need to treasure them a little more LOL

    [Reply]

    Dawn Reply:

    I pay $5.00 a dozen. (Louisiana)
    $2.50 would be awesome because I also have 4 boys and a hubby who LOVES eggs. They even like to eat boiled eggs as a snack!

    [Reply]

  47. kelly says

    I wondered after seeing your discouragment over not seeing improvement in your sons skin, if you have tried eliminating dairy from his diet. We have walked a similiar road and dairy and soy were the culprits, very very hard to eliminate but worth it to have a healthy happy kid again. Good luck, i hope you find the culprit

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    That may be the next thing we try. I don’t want to try that in the middle of this experiment so that I can figure out WHICH it is…if it’s either one of those!

    [Reply]

    kelly Reply:

    better to do one thing at at time, we have cut our wheat, dairy and
    sugar! So the trick is to reintroduce one thing at at time now to
    see if we can figure out what is bothering a few of us!

    [Reply]

  48. Sheila says

    Wow, wow, wow! I frequently have to throw away a portion of the dozen eggs that I buy at a time because they have expired! I had no idea people ate so many eggs! No-one here likes eggs by themselves, so basically I just use them in recipes. That’s amazing! My kids won’t eat eggs at all. They aren’t particularly picky eaters, so I don’t try to force them on them. One daughter doesn’t like eggs or cream cheese, but will eat basically anything else. I think it’s the texture of the eggs – one of them has literally gagged when trying it. I don’t hate them, but given another choice will choose almost anything else, so I seldom think to cook them. That’s probably why my kids never developed a taste for them.

    [Reply]

    Martha Reply:

    Oh goodness – don’t throw those eggs away! If you see they are reaching the expiration date, crack each egg into a ice cube tray and freeze them. You can use these eggs in recipes.

    [Reply]

    Susan Alexander Reply:

    I actually find eggs are good for at least a few weeks after their “expire date”. But… we don’t hit that date anymore in our house!

    [Reply]

    Dawn Reply:

    A home economist once told me eggs are good for four weeks after the date. And I learned that usually a bad egg will float, while good ones will sink. I buy lots of eggs at once, so once in a while we do hit those dates, but I don’t worry!

  49. Mary says

    I absolutely love eggs; however, my husband doesn’t. It’s a shame because there are so many wonderful things I can do with them.

    [Reply]

  50. birthrightrose says

    We have 9 hens and get 7-8 eggs per day. We use as many as we want and then give the rest to a friend from town who buys us our chicken feed. The price works out to about $3 a dozen for her when all is said and done. She gets fresh eggs, and has no chicken ‘nuggets’ fertilizing her boots!

    [Reply]

    Angela Alford Reply:

    This is such a great idea to have someone buy you your food and then they get all the eggs they can. Such a great idea!

    [Reply]

  51. Colleen Gleason says

    Slowly working my way up to using more. This recipe looks amazing. I need to dig around and find more creative ways of eating them other than the standard fried eggs or omeletts. Thanks for the inspriration.

    [Reply]

  52. Susan Alexander says

    1-2 dozen a week, but it’s just 2 adults and my two girls who are 2 and 1. Plus I frankly don’t cook healthy enough. ;) I can easily see going through 1 dozen per person in a week if you’re eating really healthy! Especially with teenage boys!

    [Reply]

  53. mml says

    We use 3-4 dozen per week(that’s rationing them) for 2 adults and an 11 yr old, 4 yr old, and 2 yr old. I could easy use 6 dz/week. Our hens(15)have finally started to pick back up! But otherwise we get eggs from our milkman at 3$/dz.

    [Reply]

  54. Maggie Hayek says

    We are like you, easily go through a dozen eggs in a sitting. when I cook eggs for the kids in the morning(8,7,5,3 1/2, and a 18 month old) we go through about 10 eggs. If my husband and I eat too, we can go through 18 in one sitting. As of right now I am still buying eggs at Sam’s due to the high cost of farm fresh eggs, it would kill me to by 4.00 per dozen at the rate we eat eggs plus baking. I am already spending 5 dollars a gallon on milk from the local farmer and we go through 3 gallons a week. That is if I don’t do extra baking or making ice cream.

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  55. Trina Miller says

    I get 1-3 dozen farm fresh eggs from a family in town, depending on how many they have available. I always take as many as they give me and we eat them all, though I do ration the farm ones if we only get 1 dozen in a week.

    [Reply]

  56. Christine Walker says

    Laura, does the cholesterol not freak you out with so many eggs? Ok, I’m sure it doesn’t, but I’m looking for the reason why. Do you have a post about that??

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Naw, it doesn’t worry me at all. I don’t have a post about it, but because we use farm fresh, organic, free range eggs, the cholesterol level in these eggs is not at an unhealthy level. The studies done to prove that eggs have too much cholesterol were done on eggs from chickens that are not raised in a healthy way.

    Hope that helps answer the question a little bit!

    [Reply]

    Jen Reply:

    Cholesterol is SUCH a vital nutrient for our bodies, especially for
    infants and children! Every cell membrane in our bodies is made up
    of cholesterol, and other important saturated fats. It’s also vital
    for development and structual integrity of the brain.

    Mainstream medicine has really gotten this one wrong. It will come out
    eventually, I have no doubt.

    If you’d like to read a really good article about this subject, please
    go to the Weston A. Price Foundation website, and search for
    “cholesterol”. The first article that comes up is “Cholesterol: Friend
    Or Foe?” written by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, who wrote “Gut and
    Psychology Syndrome”. She created the GAPS diet that is responsible
    for healing so many, MANY people of all kinds of health ailments.

    [Reply]

    Jen Reply:

    Actually, you may be surprised to know that one of the foods highest
    in cholesterol is breastmilk. (That’s something the formula companies
    won’t emulate any time soon.) It is definitely a vital nutrient! The
    problem with factory processed eggs, chicken, meat, etc…is that
    the animals are keep in awful, crowded, and unsanitary conditions while
    being fed an unnatural, nutrient-deficient diets. Thus, the
    biochemistry of the animals is completely changed and the ratio of
    omega-3 to omega-6 fats is tilted in the wrong direction. Anytime you
    are able to purchase local, pastured eggs, chicken, beef, etc…it is
    not only way superior to anything from a grocery store, they are
    nutrient dense and very good for you. I buy pastured eggs locally for
    around $3/dozen and go through 1-2 dozen a week. We could really use
    more with 2 adults and 3 kids. My older two (ages 7 and 9) love eggs
    and would eat them daily while my 3 year old is just starting to enjoy
    them.

    [Reply]

  57. says

    We use 1-2 dozen here, but if they were farm fresh and affordable I might use more. I have a friend who sells organic, free range eggs and they are $5 a dozen, I can’t afford that right now. I would love to have a few birds of my own, but they aren’t allowed in city limits.

    [Reply]

  58. Holly says

    We go through about 20 eggs in a meal. That is rationing them as well. We are a family of 7 (one is a nursing baby) and we like eggs. I cook them a lot of different ways. We usually have a big brunch on the weekend and breakfast for dinner at least one night a week. Occasionally we will have them more often. We buy a big case of 5 dozen eggs about every two weeks and pick up extra dozens as needed.

    [Reply]

  59. Dawn says

    We use 1-2 dozen a week, sometimes more, sometimes less. We seem to go in spurts. When greens are the main produce from the CSA early in the season, we eat lots of quiche and frittatas, and early winter when we eat more roots and such, we seem to eat fewer eggs.

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  60. says

    We pretty easily use 8 dozen eggs/week ~ more if I bake a casserole or other “eggs for everyone” meal – or do a lot of baking. We are a family of 8, but not all are egg lovers. DH and I each eat 2/day just for b’fast ~ Bring on the healthy cholesterol! (…and cookie dough made with safer farm-fresh eggs… yum!) =)

    [Reply]

  61. Samantha says

    We don’t go through many eggs a week… Less than a dozen. I only like eggs if they are “well done”. My daughter and husband will eat them like crazy but I refuse to buy store bought eggs and his parents chickens aren’t producing yet.. I guess its time for us to buy chickens!

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  62. Kim says

    i’ve been buying 15 dozen farm fresh eggs from azure each month and since the beginning of april we’ve gone through 8 doz. i guess that’s not a lot really…we’re a family of 8. some of the littlest ones don’t like eggs. (but i will add them raw into their smoothies) thank you, laura, for putting out the good word about azure standard!!

    [Reply]

  63. Heather T. says

    We use a lot of eggs also there are 5 of us and 4 are males, they can really eat, I cant wait until they are older. $2.50/dozen seems high, we are lucky here in WI I buy my eggs from an Amish bakery and they are from all the Amish in the community so organic farm fresh I only pay $1.25/dozen, its a great price I go once a month and get 18-24 dozen yes thats a lot of eggs but they seem to be used in so many ways. I still cant put raw eggs into things sorry its not the idea of raw eggs being bad for you it just grosses me out, its the slime factor.

    [Reply]

  64. Tami says

    We trade freshly milled wheat bread for 2 dozen farm fresh eggs from friends of ours. GREAT deal, as I feel the wheat and other ingredients are much cheaper than what we’d pay if we bought eggs at a farmer’s market or somewhere. We go in spurts of 1 1/2 – 2 weeks, as it’s just me and my husband and the two babies who don’t eat eggs yet. And now I’m on a special diet for pregnancy gallbladder problems… but when this one is born, I’ll be downing the poached eggs once again, hopefully!

    [Reply]

  65. says

    My husband and I are lucky if we go through 1 dozen eggs every 2 weeks! Normally, eggs make me gag. I was gagging trying to read about eggs! Every once in awhile, I can stomach one, but not too frequently. We are just not big egg people here!

    [Reply]

  66. julia says

    I shop every 2 weeks and buy 2 1/2 dozen but as of late, that is not getting me through to the next grocery run. And I am spending over $3 for my 2.5 dozen. You have a great deal there…especially with yours being organic.

    [Reply]

  67. says

    Our consumption varies quite abit, not sure why . . . some weeks we eat very few, BUT since I drive 1/2 hr to get my eggs (and raw milk), I only go once a week, so I usually make sure I buy enough to have a full 3 dozen (plus any partial carton) when I do my weekly milk & egg run. And occasionally we still run out. (We have two 8 yr olds & a 2 yr old (all girls)).

    [Reply]

  68. Ellen says

    We use anywhere from 4 to 6 dozen a week. I have to pay a whopping $6.00 a dozen for mine. But, right now I don’t have a choice. I want eggs from pastured chickens. Even at that price I still consider them a pretty good deal. It’s a high quality protein that I feel good about feeding my family. Sometimes I boil a dozen and put them in the fridge. My kids will ask if they can have a boiled egg for a snack. I say absolutely!

    [Reply]

  69. Christa says

    Eggs, eggs and more eggs. We are a family of 7. My husband alone ate 33 eggs last week and still going. As you said they’re very economical and a great source of protein. He’s a fitness guy and eats a special diet that requires lots of protein. The eggs are a cheap way to get it. (He does also get it from other sources, like the rest of the chicken!) We try and stock up when they’re on sale. We have breakfast for dinner when I’m running behind schedule. Throw in some cheese, spinach or salsa and you have a quick meal with some whole wheat toast.

    [Reply]

  70. Julia says

    I made these today for my MOPs group! I used 1% milk because it’s what I had, mild cheddar cheese, fresh spinach, and turkey sausage. They were SO good and SO easy! I’ll definitely be making them again!

    [Reply]

  71. says

    I made these tonight for breakfast tomorrow. The biggest problem I have is getting them out of the pan. Even with well-greasing the pan, they stuck pretty badly on the bottom. How do you keep this from happening?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Not really sure…buttering the pan well would help but I still have trouble getting them out too.

    [Reply]

    Bri Reply:

    A friend recommended the silicone baking pans/cups. I ordered some Le Creuset cups (a bit more expensive but they are supposed to be 100% silicone with no plastic filler). I’m going to try these again tomorrow if they get here and see if they work better. My husband just loves these!

    [Reply]

    Bri Reply:

    Got my Le Creuset silicone baking cups and tried them tonight. I’m ordering 12 more! They turned out perfectly! Came out of the cups right away…didn’t need my muffin tin at all (I just set the cups on a baking sheet). So wonderful…just wanted to let you know.

    [Reply]

  72. Kristi says

    Curious. When you buy your 5lbs of raw white cheddar, do you freeze part of it?? If you do, do you shred it or leave it in 1lb blocks, etc. I’ve always been told that you can’t freeze cheese in blocks, but I have learned over the last year or so that a lot of things I grew up learning about food weren’t true!! lol

    [Reply]

    Kim Reply:

    kristi, i have recently started buying 5 lbs of raw cheddar from azure and i was curious how it would freeze.. i just cut it into 3rds. it thaws just fine and tastes great, but i do think that it’s a bit more crumbly than it normally would be. like when you grate it, it seems to fall of in big chunks sometimes. but it’s still not a problem. just my two cents…

    [Reply]

    Heather T. Reply:

    I get 5lb blocks of cheese and when I open the package for the first time, I shred the whole thing in my food processor then sprinkle cornstarch over and mix in with my hands, then freeze, it doesn’t clump and comes out great just use what you need, no thawing.

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I always freeze my blocks of cheese, pulling them out throughout the month to use. After they’ve been frozen, they tend to crumble and not shred as nicely, but I don’t mind cheese crumbles. :)

    [Reply]

  73. bikey mama carie says

    Hard to believe that we eat so many eggs, seems like 4-6 dozen! & almost always cooked in a 50/50 palm oil n coconut oil mix that the hubs makes for me. Really like that my kids and us are getting good fats for good health!

    [Reply]

  74. Barbara says

    My daughter is on a VERY strict diet right now – no dairy, no grains, no sugar, no starch. We’re trying to do this with her to help and encourage, but it’s rough! She is allowed to have goat milk in things we cook/bake, and she can have goat cheese. She’s also allowed to have eggs, so we usually go through 3 dozen a week for a family of four. Our farm fresh eggs range from $2-$3/dozen.

    I made this quiche using our modifications and it’s in the oven for lunch right now! We don’t normally eat lunch meat, but she is allowed to have Hormel Natural Choice so we added turkey to the quiche. We’ll serve it with fresh cut peppers and carrots for a colorful plate.

    [Reply]

  75. Dana says

    I asked this when you posted it, but I figure it got lost in all the comments. When do you add in the cheese? Is it with the add-ins, or do you put it on top like the casserole? I’m sure either way is fine, but yours looked so yummy I wanted to get it right!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Sorry I never answered your question the first time…tough to keep up!! I just mix the cheese into the rest of the ingredients for these – makes it easier!

    [Reply]

  76. Nicole says

    I made these last week and froze them. We ate some, ok several. They are yummy! Even though I overcooked mine. :) But I don’t know what to do now. Silly I know, but I don’t. Do I thaw them overnight in the fridge and then heat them up? Or do I just heat them up from frozen? I’m new to cooking ahead and freezing things, so pardon my lack of knowledge. I am trying though!!!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    You can actually just heat them up from frozen!

    [Reply]

  77. Jen says

    I made these this afternoon because my husband seems to be in such a hurry in the morning that he doesn’t take time for breakfast. I made 50 mini quiches instead and cooked them for 12 minutes. They are really good. Thanks!

    [Reply]

  78. Erika says

    We got through 3-5 dozen a week. I love your website and get almost all my recipes from here. Thanks! I think one of the reasons I love it so much is because of your sense of humor. We kinda depend on humor around here to keep us sane :) We are a family of 9. (kids ages 2 months-15 yrs)

    [Reply]

  79. says

    Our family of four (one of which is a 4 m/o who doesn’t eat anything but breastmilk, plus a 2 year old, and of course my husband and I) go through 3-4 dozen eggs every week. We eat eggs for breakfast just about every day, because we all feel so much better with a good, high protein breakfast. Plus, eggs are so healthy!

    [Reply]

  80. Martha says

    I’m assuming the cheese is sprinkled on the top before baking? ;o)
    We have 40+ chickens, so we eat eggs every day, and the eggs that I sell pays for the chicken feed, so our eggs are free! Everyone should have chickens! :o)

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I just edited the post to be more clear about that. I actually stir the cheese into the egg mixture when I make these quichese – it’s a little easier!

    [Reply]

  81. Jennifer says

    Have you ever tried freezing these? Do they turn out ok thawed and heated up?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Yes, they freeze wonderfully. I reheat them in our toaster oven.

    [Reply]

  82. Con says

    So I guess I was supposed to take them out of the pan immediately? I did not and they stuck to the pans something fierce. Do you reheat in microwave? Do you freeze? Kids will only eat one each with breakfast but they do like them! Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Mine do stick sometimes too. :( I reheat them in the oven and yes, I do freeze them – works great!

    [Reply]

  83. Dem says

    We go through a dozen eggs every 2 to 3 days. We eat eggs every morning! I love eggs and never get tired of them. We have our own chickens and they have slowed down a little bit, but we still get about 8 eggs a day (which we split with my in-laws).

    [Reply]

  84. Katherine says

    Laura,
    I have always wondered about the cheese you purchase from Azure Standard. I think you said it’s Landmark Raw White Cheddar. I ordered it from Azure (and we loved it, mind you!), but I was concerned that it isn’t organic. What are your thoughts about that because I have always believed that things like milk products and meat are the most important things to buy organic? Thanks.

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    From the Azure Standard website:

    “The cows are fed both a mix of grain and are grass fed. During the winter months the grass does not grow and the cows are fed grain as a substitute usually ranging 6-10 lbs. per cow per day. All of our dairies are pasture based year round and the organic dairies are certified through the American Humane Association’s Free Farmed Certified Program, which we were the first cheese company in the world to do.”

    I’m not big on them being fed grain, but it sounds like they are organic overall.

    [Reply]

  85. Jen says

    I just started getting my milk and eggs from a local farm. It makes me so happy! I have made these mini quiches once before but was wondering if you have ever made them in a bar pan. I was thinking it would be easier since my quiches stuck to the tin whereas they might not with the glass bar pan. I am pretty sure my family wouldn’t notice. I may give it a try anyway and will let you know. Thanks for all your wonderful recipes and the insight you share. Merry Christmas!

    [Reply]

  86. Sarah says

    Wow! We have 4 chickens (Buff Orpington and Rhode Island Red) and 3 ducks (Welsh Harlequin), and are getting over run with eggs! We get over 3 dozen a week (even though it’s December!) and can’t keep up with them. Right now we have 5 dozen in our fridge; mostly duck eggs. We have to pay for chicken feed, but since they also free range in our garden they eat less feed. We’ve been looking for recipes that use a lot of eggs so that we can use them up, and this looks really good. Another good egg recipe is to mix scrambled eggs, cooked rice, and sausage together. That’s what we’re having for dinner tonight; yum! None of us really like eating eggs in the morning, but we usually have ‘breakfast’ for dinner once a week.

    [Reply]

  87. Kim says

    I raise hens here in Forsyth County, GA. I charge 3.00 a dozen, for fresh, free range eggs! And we still eat plenty ourselves, too!

    [Reply]

  88. Angel says

    We have 10 hens. We get 8 eggs a day. We take about 8 dozen eggs every other week to my husbands job and give them away. Farms charge 4 dollars a dozen around here for eggs. I live in Texas. And, we free range our hens. Just feels better to give them away then to charge.

    [Reply]

  89. Sara says

    We have myself, my husband, and a 4 year old girl and we go through 4 dozen a week. We pay about $3.00 per dozen, which is not bad at all!

    [Reply]

  90. kayla says

    I just made these for Christmas breakfast n they turned out PERFECT!!!!
    I used a silicone muffin pan and buttered it well and they didn’t stick at all!
    they r picture perfect! thanks for the recipe!!!!

    [Reply]

  91. Kymberly Lynch says

    I get eggs from my mother-in-law. She has a large flock of chickens so we are set. :) and we love them. Recently, we got a very large egg that was almost 3x as big as normal! with that and all the blue eggs and getting to collect the eggs themselves really has the children excited about eggs :) We could eat this recipe everyday but sometime we have soaked oatmeal.

    [Reply]

  92. Vivian Mitchell says

    I made two of these for the weekend before Christmas when I was having company. When people straggled down for breakfast, the coffee was ready and the toast and quiche could have them sitting down to breakfast in a couple of minutes! I made them in a 9 x 13 glass dish and cut it into (3 by 4) 12 pieces. I had made meringues earlier, so used 6 extra yolks, counted as 3 eggs, plus 9 eggs. My recipe calls for 2 cups whipping cream and 2 cups of cheese. The only thing I changed in the recipe I used was that I cooked my onions before adding them (my personal preference). I put each piece into a zip lock baggy….worked well.

    [Reply]

  93. Cindy says

    Since my husband (and his dad too) have/had cholesterol problems, I try to substitute for eggs when I cook, unless we’re actually EATING eggs. We love scrambled eggs, and I have a lovely ham/egg/cheese frittata that I make in muffin cups. Some recipes I just can’t get around eggs, but many I have found substitutes for. We usually go through 1-2 dozen per week. We have a local commercial farm that sells eggs to our grocery store, so we get those to support our local business.

    [Reply]

  94. Ania says

    My family loves eggs but everyone has the different style they like most. Hubby loves sunny side up or poached, my daughter hardboiled sliced on toast or soft boiled with a sprinkle of salt. My son loves “my Polish” style scrambled egg (where the egg is put in hot pan without mixing it in a bowl first, and slowly cooked without breaking the yolk too much, that way the white cooks and yolk is still creamy soft) I don’t care for the “american” scrambled eggs either but I do love my eggs any other way they could be cooked. But lately i have been on a diet (for about a year) and switched to egg whites only. Still, every week we use 2 dozen eggs and a carton of egg whites. I too think Egg is a great source of protein and the yolk is brain food. We are so lucky to not have any cholesterol problems in my family. Eggs are fantastic wonder food where you could cook them in 100s different ways and each time tastes different. WHOO HOO for eggs

    [Reply]

  95. Denyce says

    We eat eggs every morning (or maybe six out of seven) since we’ve been avoiding grains for the last few weeks. It’s a struggle to keep enough eggs. We are going through about a dozen a day between the five of us. I think my five-year old could easily eat three or four every morning. They are economical, though, and in a way, I wish we could just have them for every meal without getting tired of them.

    [Reply]

  96. Melody says

    I would like to make the breakfast casserole and freeze it for later. Could I freeze it raw and bake it another day? If so, should I thaw it first?

    [Reply]

    LindseyforLaura@HHM Reply:

    That would work! If you want to thaw it you could, but if you run out of time or forgot it should still be fine to bake.

    [Reply]

  97. Dottie Mahaney says

    I’m a personal chef and cook mini quiches for clients that work out a lot. Also for the working stiff that has no time to cook in the a m. 10 seconds in the micro and done. OR eat it cold. I put chopped veggies and cheese as well as the eggs and low fat milk. A tad of nutmeg makes an interesting flavor.

    [Reply]

  98. betty says

    Always enjoy your posts..going to share this post with my son. They raise chickens-organic free range eggs-DELICIOUS–keep on posting and sharing your joy.

    [Reply]

  99. says

    Just wanted to say thank you for this recipe! We’ve enjoyed it a lot over the past couple of years. Now that we have chickens in the backyard, we’re always looking for ways to use up those eggs, and this is a great (and easy!) one!

    [Reply]

  100. Holly says

    I am the only egg eater in my home, my husband can’t stand them so I use about half a dozen a week. I have my three girls (chickens) who provide about a dozen or more a week. The best eggs ever they make normal eggs taste like water, and mine come in brown, green, and pink. I can only eat 4oz a meal so this will help me make just right sized high protein healthy portions. All I need now is a bulk freeze and bake carbonara and I will be set. Thank you.

    [Reply]

  101. Brianne Klotzsche says

    I did not have good luck with the regular breakfast casserole dish and never got a reply for help with that and I haven’t tried it again. Perhaps I’ll try the crustless mini version and see what happens.

    If using regular sized muffin tins, how should the bake time be adjusted?

    Any modifications for high altitude (6500′)?

    Thanks,
    Brianne

    [Reply]

    LindseyforLaura@HHM Reply:

    The recipe will work for regular sized muffin tins. Just follow the recipe and you should be just fine. With the higher altitude you may need to add a few minutes to the baking time. I would not increase the heat, just add a few minutes of time. Hope that helps! :)

    [Reply]

  102. Julia Lindsay says

    My sister assures me that if the eggshell is intact, you don’t have to be afraid of eating raw eggs if you wash them very well, dry them very well and then crack them open. I put a raw egg in my smoothies all the time. Just make sure you keep it in a cool place if you don’t drink the entire smoothie right away. I love your site and you have great looking recipes. I make a hobby of looking at recipes and determining if they’re any good without ever making them. I will be making some of yours. Your ingredients are so pure and delicious sounding. I’m a big believer in real food: cream, butter, eggs, etc. God bless. Julie

    [Reply]

  103. Sarah says

    Hello – I baked and froze these (rather than freezing raw). How long should I bake or microwave to serve in the morning?

    Thanks so much!

    [Reply]

  104. Christi says

    My 5 year old daughter and I can easily go through 2 or three dozen just the two of us… eggs are great for protein and some healthy fats, are a complete protein, and very cheap on the per serving level for the nutrients you are getting.. even when i i’m stuck paying $4 a dozen bc the lady with the $2.50 a dozen eggs is already sold out lol.
    have you tried duck eggs?!?! they’re so rich! i’ve read they are great for baking, but in my experience they make things very heavy and thats typically the opposite of what i am going for!

    [Reply]

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