How to Make Fresh Butter

If you recall, last week when I showed you how to make mozzarella cheese, I mentioned that if you’re making it from raw milk, you skim off the cream and save it to make butter.  HERE is one way to make butter!

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Fill your food processor 1/3 full of heavy cream.  Be sure not to fill it more than 1/3 full…it will probably not turn into butter if there’s too much in the container.

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Turn your food processor on high…and then flee the room.  (It’s really loud and annoying!)  The food processor will whip and whip and whip the cream until it turns it into butter.  It should take somewhere between 8-15 minutes.

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Once the fat has been “pulled out” of the cream, it should look something like this…and you can turn off the food processor.

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Pull all the solid pieces and squish them together. 
Place the solids in to a clean bowl.

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 Run some clean COLD water into it.

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Clean the butter with the cold water by squishing it with a wooden spoon until all the liquid comes out of it.  Repace the cold water 2-3 times as you clean it.

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Squeeze the excess water out of the butter and shape it with your hands.

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Ah, look…a lovely little butter ball.

You can add salt to the cream if you want salted butter…this will also be a preservative, making the butter last longer.

OR…if you don’t have a food processor and want to have a little family fun…put your cream into a jar and shake it like crazy.  Pass the jar around, and take turns shaking it.  (I’ve tried shaking it all by myself once when no one was around to help…and I thought my head and arms would fall off from shaking the jar so much all by myself.  I don’t think I ever got butter out of that jar.)

Have you ever made butter before?  Isn’t it COOL to see the butter form out of the cream!? 

I LOVE how with just one little gift from a cow (or goat or whatever) you can make SO MANY great yummy things!

P.S.  Even if you don’t have fresh cream…go buy some heavy whipping cream at the store and try making butter.  It’s just…cool.

Next week…RICOTTA CHEESE!  :)

(Join us Saturday for the little Green Project!)
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This post is linked to Frugal Fridays.

Comments

  1. Katelyn says

    I have been doing this a couple time now, and wondered what on earth to do with the lovely left over liquid, so I did some research… it is buttermilk! Did you know this?? :)

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I’m a little unsure on this myself. It is buttermilk, but it is much thinner than what I use as regular buttermilk. I use it in baking in place of milk after I have made butter.

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    Katie Reply:

    There are two different types of buttermilk, the kind that comes from making butter and cultured buttermilk, the kind that you know from purchasing in stores. The buttermilk made as a result of making butter is excellent in home-made pancakes and biscuits. Hope this helps!

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    Sarah Reply:

    I was wondering if anyone knows how to make honey butter???? Oh and thanks for the awesome tops with using the butter milk after I hate to see any part wasted:)

    Janet Reply:

    I have found that if you put 1T of buttermilk into 4C of cream and let it sit for about 24 hrs. it makes wonderful cultured butter and the cultured buttermilk left behind is great! Just like the store bought!

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  2. Atom&Yves says

    Katelyn, I used the ‘shake in a jar’ method and was taken by the appearance of the leftover liquid when the ball-o-butter had formed. It looked like whole milk, so I tasted it. It had so much more flavor than store-bought Vit D whole milk, I drank the whole thing. I’ve heard the liquid can be used to make pancakes, biscuits and more.

    [Reply]

    Katelyn Reply:

    After I found out what it was, I started saving it in a bottle in the fridge and make biscuits with it when I have enough saved up. I love the “use the whole cow” mentality, or in this case, all the cream :)

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  3. Brittany says

    I read the salt preserves it longer but do you know how long the unsalted butter would last? maybe as long as the cream would last?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I would say unsalted would probably last about two weeks.

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    Crickett Reply:

    You can leave it out for about a week without it going bad. It will stay in the frig for about 6 months and the freezer a year. If you have a butter crock, it will keep butter for up to 30 days without requiring refrigeration. All that is require is cold, fresh water to perform its magic……at room temp.

    [Reply]

    Katelyn Reply:

    I’ve also noticed when I do remember to add salt to the food processor, it seems to make the butter form up a bit faster, and when I don’t add salt (because I forget) the process takes longer and my food processor actually quits on me! Has this happened to anyone else?

    [Reply]

    Coriena Reply:

    Am wondering how much salt to cream? Also will this butter freeze,
    and is the left over cream after the butter is taken out the first
    time.. is that now skim milk?

    [Reply]

    Jennifer Reply:

    I am not sure about how much salt to add to the butter, I would say add to taste. But I freeze store bought butter all the time with no problem with it once it’s thawed.

  4. Holly says

    Awesome, it is so easy!!! and tastes way better than any store bought butter out there…I’m and going to attempt the mozz. cheese next but you can’t beat homemade butter especially knowing it is this easy…

    [Reply]

  5. says

    Being raised on a dairy farm all of this is what we did everyday. Kinda fun to do it sometimes know.I have frozen the butter it came out like fresh made.

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  6. Anita says

    I’ve just found your website…love it. Seriously love the idea of whole food my kids will love.

    We homeschool too, and did a unit on the “Little House” books. It was a blast to make butter with the kids. Here’s a tip that makes it loads of fun for a group of kids. Let them shake the jar while jumping on a trampoline…also works for making ice cream. We had butter and ice cream and the kids had a fun work-out!

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  7. says

    When we make butter we use an old fashioned butter churn!

    This is how we keep the children occupied on rainy days during re-enacting season. One person would not want to do this it is a lot of work.

    [Reply]

  8. says

    Hi there! I have been here many times, but happened to catch on to this pin from Pinterest. What caught me was the firmness of the butter ball (tee hee hee! that sounds so silly to me!)
    I have made milk from our raw cow’s milk shares many times, but the flavor rarely meets my standards. I am letting it set out a la Weston A Price/culture standards, or at least I was. I am not ready to go along with cultured butter, though, no matter how much healthier it might be. Sigh…
    But the thing is, is that I just can’t seem to get all the milk out! I use out Hamilton Beach food processor and once it’s got that first “milking” as we call it, we pour that out and save it, then begin adding cold water (we don’t use ice, becuase we don’t make ice) to work in with the food processor. I have begun going that several times until is runs pretty clear. Still, I have never been able to actually form the ball in my hand. I will admit to doing it once, naively thinking that it would just … happen! Guess how that turned out! lol! I have used paddles and bamboo flat spoons to try to squish it out, but I just. can’t. get. it all out!
    How do you get it to that point?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Yes, I have a hard time getting all of the water out too. I usually find that working it with my hands works best for this.

    [Reply]

    Amber Reply:

    I am having trouble with the liquid part too. my butter was so soft I
    lost a lot of while trying to squeeze the water out. I used the jar
    shaker method, tried a blender but the cream was getting very hot and
    so was the blender. Not sure what I am doing wrong.

    [Reply]

    Suzanne Reply:

    I have found that the temperature of the cream really determines if you end up with soft butter or hard butter. Let it warm up a bit on the counter before processing it, but do not let it get too warm or it will be soft. Hope that helps.

    [Reply]

  9. kentucky Lady 717 says

    I made this butter today, used my mixer…took me a little over 10 mins…..I did not run cold water over the butter, I just kept mashing the butter against the bowl,until I got all the water out….then salted it and put in a container…had some today with my dinner on rolls and it was really good….I have a good cup of milk left from the butter, which I will use in my cornbread tomorrow….
    My question is, why do you have to wash the butter ??? I didn’t and it came out fine……

    [Reply]

    Melanie Reply:

    I have heard that the butter doesn’t last as long if you do not rinse it, beause the “buttermilk” makes it spoil faster. It’s not harmful, it just doesn’t keep as long.

    [Reply]

    LindseyforLaura@HHM Reply:

    It gets all the water out of it when you wash it.

    [Reply]

  10. kentucky Lady 717 says

    Sorry I meant to say I just kept mashing the butter against the bowl, until I got all the milk out…….

    [Reply]

  11. Shea says

    Has anyones butter come out sour? We have grass fed cows (they mostly free range off our land but are supplemented with a bit of hay). I’ve tried making butter several times over the year but the butter has a wierd distinctive sour smell and flavor. This being made with fresh raw milk. I’m not sure if it makes a difference but I was taught to but the cold cream in the butter mixer and then set that in a hot water bath and then blend for 25 min or so. I wonder if that has anything to do with the smell/flavor? That is really the only difference from what you are doing. What do you ladies think?

    [Reply]

    Jamie Garcia Reply:

    My butter doesn’t break unless it’s cold. Breaking is what it does
    suddenly when the fat separates from the buttermilk.

    Here are some helpful sites:
    http://www.cheesemaking.com/Butter.html
    http://familycow.proboards.com/index.cgi

    I’ve also been told by my father that if the cows are eating certain
    types of weeds it can make the milk taste nasty for a bit until
    it’s all out of their system.

    [Reply]

  12. Karli says

    Just made homemade butter for the first time and also my first real “wholesome/homemade” food product… OMG it was AMAZING! I’ve never been happier to have my hands covered in butter :P

    [Reply]

  13. Amanda says

    Is there any other way to shape the butter other than a ball? Just curious if anyone has shaped it differently. If a recipe calls for a certain amt (tbsp) of butter, do you just sort of wing it?

    [Reply]

    LindseyforLaura@HHM Reply:

    You could probably shape it however you want. It doesn’t have to be a ball. :)
    I would use a liquid measuring spoon to measure it out. Just make sure to pack it in.

    [Reply]

  14. Kathy tennyson says

    Do I use cold cream or room temp?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Either one, but I do find that room temp works a little bit better.

    [Reply]

  15. carole says

    yay!! I did it!! i did it!! :-) super fun and since i only had about a cup of cream, i did it by hand in a jam jar and got a little tricep exercise in, too ;-)
    thanks so much!!!

    [Reply]

  16. Paula M says

    I just made my first pound of butter in the food processor. Using a quart of raw cream was too much for my machine and the buttermilk all leaked out. Oh well live and learn. It was fun. I’ll definitely continue to do this since I can get raw cream from organic grass fed cows. What a difference. I grew up on Land O Lakes since 1955 who new it was garbage and full of GMO’s, chemicals, and artificial colors.

    [Reply]

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