Coconut Oil: Why it is Good For You and Where to Buy it

Why Coconut Oil is Good For You

I’m often talking about coconut oil around here.  I use it for baking. I use it on our skin. My favorite lotion bar is made from coconut oil.  I highly encourage eating coconut oil and letting coconut oil help heal your system!

Today I’d like to answer a couple of frequently asked Coconut Oil questions…

Why is coconut oil good for you?

Coconut Oil is a saturated fat…something we’re told today to stay away from. My research has taught me to disagree with this. I’m not afraid of saturated fats. Please read this well written and well researched article, which explains saturated fats and coconut oil way better than I ever could!

Coconut Oil:  Why it is Good For You

Coconut oil is a stable fat, which means that it doesn’t go rancid easily like unsaturated fats do. (Unsaturated fats, like canola and vegetable oils, go rancid within just a few hours of being produced. This means that they are already rancid by the time they make it to grocery store shelves.)  Those living in tropical climates, consuming large amounts of coconut oil have low rates of heart desease, cancer and colon problems.  Coconut Oil can actually help you lose weight and fight infections. It is anti-fungal. It has the ability to keep your thyroid healthy.

Where can you buy Coconut Oil?

I’ve not seen high quality coconut oil in my local grocery stores, but I live in a fairly small town without a lot of options. I have seen coconut oil at Wal-mart…and it works if I’m desperate…but it is far from great in my opinion.

I always buy my coconut oil online, as this is where I find the best prices. High quality coconut oil may seem expensive, but I consider coconut oil to be a healing, whole food…therefore the cost is worth it!

A good price for high quality virgin coconut oil, according to what I have found, is around $14/quart. I love it (of course) if I can find it for less than that! I watch for it to go on sale and compare prices at any of the following:

~ Tropical Traditions (watch for sales on both their Virgin Coconut Oil or their Expeller Pressed Coconut Oil.)

Vitacost – get $10 off your first $30 order!

~ Mountain Rose Herbs (Can be bought by the gallon here, helping this purchase to be very cost effective. Since Coconut Oil keeps for a long time…purchasing a gallon bucket is a great idea to help cut the cost!)

~ Amazon (Nutiva Organic Coconut Oil seems to be the best price at Amazon.)

~ Food Co-ops – If you’re a part of a health food co-op, you’ll likely be able to buy coconut oil through them.

What if I don’t like the taste of coconuts? Does coconut have a strong coconut flavor?

There are two types of coconut oil and both are good for you. One tastes like coconuts, and the other doesn’t!

Virgin (unrefined) Coconut Oil has a strong coconut flavor. It is processed in such a way that helps it keep the coconuty taste. I love Virgin Coconut Oil for baking.

Expeller Pressed Coconut Oil doesn’t have a flavor at all! It is processed differently, taking away any flavor, but keeping the nutrients intact. I’ve almost always found this variety of coconut oil to be less expensive. In fact, Mountain Rose Herbs has Virgin Coconut Oil for only $24/gallon + shipping…making it around $9/quart!!!!

How do I measure Coconut Oil for a recipe?

I addressed this question in my recent post:  How to Adapt a Recipe to Make it Healthier. I encourage you to read this post, and read through the comments as many of you shared easy ways to measure coconut oil. I pretty much just “eyeball it” when I measure! :)

What other Coconut Oil questions do you have? Do you like the coconut flavor, or do you prefer your coconut oil to be flavorless?

This post was originally published March 15, 2011.

Like This? Bless Others By Sharing!
Share on Facebook208Pin on Pinterest179Tweet about this on Twitter0Email this to someoneShare on LinkedIn2Print this page

Comments

  1. Susan says

    You can also find good prices on vitacost.com for the Nutiva brand. Be sure to read the comments from customers who have brought Nutiva. I’ve bought it for years and love it.

    [Reply]

  2. says

    I get Nutiva from Amazon.com. It has lasted a long time for me. I use it mostly as a sub for shortening or butter in baking, especially my coconut cupcakes. I’ve also made a chest rub for my little ones and use it as a moisturizer. To actually answer your question: I love the subtle coconut scent and flavor.

    [Reply]

  3. Natasha D says

    I have heard that coconut oil is great for thyroid problems. I have had hypothyroidism for 18 years (first diagnosed at age 12). I have yet to try it because of cost and lack of it stocked in our grocery stores. I too live in a small town. I really just need to make the leap and try this. I bake alot so the cost may slow my baking a bit. Thanks for the information.

    [Reply]

    Missie Reply:

    Natasha,
    If you sign up for Tropical Traditions email alerts, you can be advised of buy one, get one free sales they have pretty frequently on their oils. That’s how I stock up on mine. I never buy coconut oil full price. Also, they have a fantastic referral program where you can earn free oil for referring new customers when they make their first purchase. I have earned about ten jars that way.

    I started using (sounds like an addiction, doesn’t it?) about a year ago when Laura did another article about TT and coconut oil. It has changed the way I cook and bake and am so thankful for the introduction of this healthy habit into our diets.

    [Reply]

    Merrilee Reply:

    Natasha (or Laura),
    Where have you gotten the info about cocnut oil & hypothyroidism? I have been trying to find a reliable source that it helps, but haven’t been able to find anything.
    I would prefer to find something more natural than replacement hormones to address it.

    Thanks!
    Merrilee

    [Reply]

  4. Heidi says

    I am wondering if it is important to buy unrefined coconut oil if you use like you do. Which would be better: refined, expeller pressed or unrefined cold pressed coconut oil? Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    It really just depends on if you prefer the flavor of coconuts or if you’d prefer to have an “unflavored” oil. I like having both! I don’t like my french fries or other fried foods to taste like coconuts…so I use the expeller pressed coconut oil for those needs. But in baking, I love how the unrefined tastes.

    My understanding is that the various oils are all very good for you. Here’s a great page on the Tropical Traditions site that explains the different way coconut oil is made: http://www.tropicaltraditions.com/what_is_virgin_coconut_oil.htm

    [Reply]

    Sara B Reply:

    Sorry, I am commenting all over this post…just a little confused. I read this website and it said coconut oil can be refined by using chemicals. Is this bad? I thought you said that there was no difference in refined vs virgin oils?

    [Reply]

    Melisa Reply:

    Yes, refining with chemicals is bad. No matter what, some of the chemicals remain in the final product although they are not required to list them on the ingredients list.

  5. Denise says

    My family is crazy about coconut oil! We buy it by the 5-gallon bucket from Tropical Traditions. It lasts us about a year that way. We use it for pretty much everything. I keep olive oil around for times I need an oil that does not harden at room temp, but 95% of the oil used in our home is coconut oil. Husband and son use it as lotion after bathing. We give it to our goats when they need to put on weight (when they are milking heavily), and we give it to our dogs as well. It’s an incredible product!!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    I have heard that you can use it as a lotion. Do you put it on just like a regular lotion or do you have to do something to it first? I have never researched it, but have been wanted to try it. Also, you said you use it to put weight on your goats. Uumm, I realize a child and a goat are two different little creatures, but my son struggles to keep his weight up and I have been looking for healthy ways to increase his weight. Have you heard of PEOPLE using it for that?
    Thanks a million!

    [Reply]

    Denise Reply:

    Amy, we put the coconut oil bucket by the woodstove to make it very soft – even liquid. Then we pour it into bowls and keep it in the bathroom for use after bathing. We don’t do anything special to it. Just rub it all over. My husband and son love it. I don’t like to use it all over my body, as I feel it’s too greasy. But I do use it on problem areas that are dry and itchy.

    As far as using it for your son, I don’t know why you couldn’t. You could mix it into a smoothie – just use about a tablespoon as a serving. You could also mix it into oatmeal or mac & cheese. Pretty much anything that you could stir it into that would melt it. It’s a healthy fat, which is why I use it for putting weight on my goats. You’ll just have to be sure that it’s not adding fat to your son. When goats are milking, they use LOTS of calories to make the milk. That’s why adding a healthy fat to their diet doesn’t make them fat. It just gives them the calories they need. Could be the same with your son – his metabolism may be so high that he burns lots of calories. I hope it helps!

    [Reply]

    Sara B Reply:

    I thought coconut oil helps people lose weight?

    Denise Reply:

    Sara B, I think that perhaps the weight loss would happen when you subbed coconut oil for less healthy oils.

    Sara B Reply:

    ah, thank you!

    Melisa Reply:

    Amy,
    From personal experience; if you do decide to use coconut oil either as an ingredient or supplement, do so in slowly increasing amounts. If you aren’t used to using it and then begin at the recommended amount (3T a day for adults), it can cause some severe abdominal/intestinal distress…like 6 hours of not being able to leave the bathroom.

    [Reply]

  6. Tessa says

    This is a family friendly website, so I understand if you delete this comment, but coconut oil is quite handy in the bedroom for intimate moments!!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I personally think that your comment is very family friendly. :) Thanks for sharing this…hopefully some couples can benefit from learning this!

    [Reply]

    Danielle B Reply:

    Yup.. been using it for that purpose for many years. :-)

    I do have unrefined in the pantry.. but have yet to use it!

    [Reply]

  7. lcg says

    Does it matter if it liquifies and then re-hardens? Do you store it in the refrigerator? And it’s okay to buy a gallon of it and then just store it? Thanks

    [Reply]

    Holly in Virginia Reply:

    It is ok if it liquifies and rehardens. My kitchen can get pretty warm
    and my coconut oil will melt but I have never had a problem with just
    putting it back on the shelf and using it again the next time. I do not
    store it in the refrigerator, just a dark shelf in my pantry.

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    That’s the great thing about coconut oil. It is so stable, that it doesn’t matter if it changes temps. I don’t store it in the fridge…no need…plus it would be tough to get out of the container when it’s that cold! Yes, buying a gallon is a great way to save money since it’s doesn’t go bad! Sometimes, I buy big amounts and split the cost/share the oil with friends to save money too!

    [Reply]

  8. says

    Laura, I don’t want to step on your toes or anything like that. You say to “eyeball” it or you melt it and measure it. To be honest, I eyeball practically everything I make, but there are so many people who aren’t comfortable doing that. Since coconut oil is solid, the best way I know of to truly measure it is to take a large measuring cup and add 1 or 2 cups of cold water (depending on the size of the measuring cup). Then, scoop the coconut oil into the cup, read the measurement, subtract the amount of water you started with, and you have your coconut oil measurement. It won’t mix with the water, it’ll float, and you can scoop it right out or drain the water and dump it out. It’s really easy.
    Just thought I’d share that. I don’t want to undermine you, and I hope you don’t mind ME giving advice on YOUR site!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    You’re ALWAYS welcome to share what works for you…that’s what I love about this “community”!! :) I love it when people share ideas and tips that I’ve never thought of before!

    [Reply]

    Mkcoehoorn Reply:

    That’s the method I was originally taught for measuring shortening. Any semi-solid “oil” can be measured that way.

    [Reply]

  9. Shannon says

    And it makes an excellent deodorant!

    [Reply]

    Kathy Feusse Reply:

    how do make a deodorant from coccnut oil??

    [Reply]

    Melisa Reply:

    There are several recipes for adding coconut oil and other ingredients such as baking soda, but you don’t need to. Just put a VERY thin layer on each of your underarms. Works really really well.

    [Reply]

  10. Tracy says

    I was wondering about the statement that many oils go rancid within hours and are already rancid on the shelf. Rancid just means they smell or taste bad. The oil I buy at the store smells and tastes fine. I have kept oil too long before, and then it smelled awful, and I called it rancid. But I’ve never bought one from the store that smelled bad already. I’m not sure what you are talking about? Could you explain? As far as I knew “rancid” is not some specific scientifically defined change, just a bad smell or taste.

    [Reply]

    Holly in Virginia Reply:

    Full text can be found here: http://westonaprice.org/know-your-fats/559-the-great-con-ola
    Scroll down to “Processing” for the following quote in context:

    “The oil is removed by a combination of high temperature mechanical pressing and solvent extraction. Traces of the solvent (usually hexane) remain in the oil, even after considerable refining. Like all modern vegetable oils, canola oil goes through the process of caustic refining, bleaching and degumming–all of which involve high temperatures or chemicals of questionable safety. And because canola oil is high in omega-3 fatty acids, which easily become rancid and foul-smelling when subjected to oxygen and high temperatures, it must be deodorized. The standard deodorization process removes a large portion of the omega-3 fatty acids by turning them into trans fatty acids. Although the Canadian government lists the trans content of canola at a minimal 0.2 percent, research at the University of Florida at Gainesville, found trans levels as high as 4.6 percent in commercial liquid oil.24 The consumer has no clue about the presence of trans fatty acids in canola oil because they are not listed on the label.”

    [Reply]

    Holly in Virginia Reply:

    Also, rancid is the word that describes the decomposition of fat. So something
    that is rancid is spoiled/rotting and ought not be eaten. I hope all that helps.

    [Reply]

  11. Abby says

    Maybe I can help…
    There is no reason to make this harder than it is :) Coconut oil is a very stable fat and does not go rancid. It also has a melting point of about 76 degrees. So for measuring all you have to do is either keep your jar at 76 degrees (or warmer)or place your jar in warm water for a few seconds….then pour into your measuring cup.
    It’s that easy.
    I buy LOTS of coconut oil and use it for everything so I just have designated jars for smaller amounts to keep in the kitchen and the bathroom. Oh and no, it will not hurt it to melt and then solidify again. I would, however, keep used oil (for frying and the like) in a separate container due to food particles that may be present.
    I really hope this helps some of you. I really enjoy reading the posts. This is the only site that I check for updates daily.

    Thank you so much :)

    [Reply]

  12. says

    I have been using coconut oil for… well… everything. I use a little of it as a facial moisturizer, but recently I have been seeing massive breakouts in the places I use it. Any thoughts?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Yikes, I don’t know! I know some people are sensitive or even allergic to it, but if you’d been using it without trouble and are just now experiencing break-outs…how frustrating!

    [Reply]

  13. Lisette says

    We use a Measure-all cup (from Pampered Chef) for coconut oil and all other messy measurements (mayo, etc.) It works great for that and other things like brown sugar too!

    [Reply]

  14. Kathy Feusse says

    I get my coconut oil from Green Pasture Products….I love it!! I get it by the gallon!!! We make popcorn with it and even put it in our oatmeal. yummy. I also LOVE to bake with it.

    [Reply]

  15. Nannis says

    Great info – who knew the benefits of Coconut oil! I already know the benefits of teaching my kids about The Lamb who was slain ;) Great midweek post today hh! ;)

    [Reply]

  16. says

    I love love coconut oil, I buy my from wilderness family naturals. It doesn’t really have a coconut taste. I use it to fry my pancakes and really really “Hands down’ they taste the best when I do this!!! I have used it in place of oil for my mayo and to make frosting for cakes (though it will change the consisitency).

    If only people knew how much fat I ate they would be shocked…I have a friend who is constantly putting her child on a diet (eating rice cakes and cutting out the fat), when she saw that my kids ate butter, and coconut oil and were all slender she started to think about it! Kids and adults need fat!

    [Reply]

    Sara B Reply:

    My parents and siblings eat TONS of butter and are slender and healthy. Is butter the samea s coconut oil in the health benefit area?

    [Reply]

    adam's wife Reply:

    no – butter doesn’t have the medium-chain fatty acids and the lauric
    acid that makes coconut oil so healthy. and if you use it on your
    skin, you’ll smell like the movie theater all day long :)

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Butter has great benefits of it’s own, especially raw, grass fed butter: http://www.whale.to/a/butter.html

    [Reply]

    Sara B Reply:

    WOW!! That article was so powerful. At least to me :D. Grassfed cow butter for us is 2.79 for a 1/2 pound. Is there a better price where you buy, Laura?
    And adam’s wife…I believe the article said that butter does in fact contain medium-chain faty acids, but I may be wrong! Maybe just not as many as coconut oil?

    Laura Reply:

    I’m able to get it for $4/pound from the lady I get my raw milk from, which is a REALLLLLLY good deal. I’d say…bake and cook with the “regular butter” and then use the special grassfed butter for spreading on bread or potatoes. :)

    Sara B Reply:

    That’s so funny, that’s just what my husband and I were talking about doing today…grassfed for spreading and commercial for baking. :) Is that what you do? If you don’t mind me asking. Sorry for asking so many questions on here. I was raised to eat healthy, but your blog has opened up so many new facets to that in my quest to feed my own family healthy. Thank you for all your time!

    Laura Reply:

    Yes, that’s what I do…grassfed for spreading, commercial for baking. IF I get my hands on the grassfed. She doesn’t always have enough to sell.

  17. Nicole says

    I use it on my 4 month old daughter every day since she was born. I rub it on her whole body each night after a bath. She was a month early and had some skin issues from being born so early but since using it I have had no diaper rash and any scrape or bump she has goes away within a day or so after putting it on. I believe it has helped her to gain the much needed weight that she needed. She was born at 4 pounds 10 ounces and is now 12 pounds at 4 months! Just a suggestion :)

    [Reply]

    Alli Reply:

    How much did you give your daughter? I’m really excited to try this with my preemie twin girls! The neonatologist told me to add neosure formula to breastmilk twice a day for extra calories but the second ingredient is corn syrup solids. YUCK!

    [Reply]

    Nicole Reply:

    I would just take a bit of the oil (like half a teaspoon) and rub it on
    their skin at night, or whenever you give them a bath. That is so
    great that you are thinking of using it on your babies. It has so
    many beneficial things in it for their skin and the body in general.
    As for the formula they told me to do that also and I did it once and then read the ingredients like you did and did not use it again. I would say if your milk is coming in ok I would use that
    but it it totally up to you. My daughter is now 14 months old and
    is healthy, happy and eats everything in sight. If you do need to
    supplement I know there are formulas that are organic without any of
    the bad ingredients in them. If you have any other questions I would
    be happy to help you in any way I can. Hope this helps!!!

    [Reply]

  18. Rox says

    Like Laura said you might be allergic to it. If you have oily skin you never want to put anything heavy like coconut oil. I believe it clogs the pores which in turn causes acne.

    [Reply]

  19. says

    Laura, I think if I ever met you in person you’d be getting a huge hug from me. I am looking into buying coconut oil now…there are soo many options!! This post was so well-timed!

    [Reply]

    Sara B Reply:

    so there is no difference in health issues between the two? I was going to buy the gallon ofrefined organic coconut oil from mountain rose herbs and they seem to name it as non-food type pof coconut oil. what does everyone think? also, is that something I would have to melt before using in everything? can I use it for frying? thanks in advance!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    They do make it sound like a non-food…but we eat it no problem! This article from Tropical Traditions is helpful: http://www.tropicaltraditions.com/what_is_virgin_coconut_oil.htm

    Yes, you need to melt it down if you want to stir it into a recipe and yes, you can use it for frying!

    [Reply]

    Kristin Reply:

    Laura,
    You have the refined oil from mt. Rose herbs and use it to cook with? I bought the gallon mainly to make lotion, deodorant and chapstick but I have been hesitant in using it to cook with since it says for cosmetic purposes. I really didn’t want to buy more coconut oil when I have almost a whole gallon of it under my sink!!

    Laura Reply:

    The refined coconut oil I have is from Tropical Traditions actually, but I’ve not had any trouble cooking with it. It’s flavorless and works great for me.

  20. Julie says

    Thanks for this info on the oil! I have bought some and have really enjoyed using it it recipes. I haven’t come across any recipe that it doesn’t work for.

    [Reply]

  21. Lauren says

    Thanks for your post, Laura. Have been wanting to look into the health and beauty benefits of coconut oil. For those interested in buying at Tropical Traditions, I found a promo code at retailmenot.com:

    Code: 120311
    Receive 10% off your entire order.

    [Reply]

  22. Rachel L. says

    Just wanted to post the other half of the controversy over coconut oil. The following has a post from a Jeff Novick, a Registered Dietitian, who has masters in nutrition and teaches nutrition all over the country. His article has more recent and substantial researh articles. http://www.jeffnovick.com/RD/Newsletter/Entries/2008/4/10_Marketing_Junk_Food%3A_Dont_Go_Cuckoo_Over_Coconut_Oil.html

    [Reply]

    Danielle B Reply:

    well… I’m sure Laura can expound on this or correct me if I mistype it. But there are GOOD saturated fats, just like there are BAD carbs (simple) and good carbs (complex). And I also wonder if Novick compared refined vs unrefined CO.

    [Reply]

    Sara B Reply:

    Thanks for this article! I read it, and it made me scared to buy that gallon of coconut oil. But the more I read it and read other sources about coconut oil and other good fats, I just went ahead and bought it. To me, as a dietitian he is more likely to take the side of what most Americans believe and teach is “good” and “healthy.” It seems like this mindset has led to obesity and the like. I have done a poor job of explaining myself, but it was just a thought.

    [Reply]

  23. says

    Thanks, I’ve been waiting for you to write about this. They sell it at my food co-op so I’ll pick it up there next month. This month I stocked up on sucanat and spelt flour. Thanks for the info on sucanat, we are enjoying it! (We had been on the agave banwagon for awhile too (few years ago)- we are glad to have an alternative.

    [Reply]

  24. says

    What a timely post! Was just attempting some coconut oil research this morning and was getting overwhelmed with all the different “grades”.

    So is the expeller pressed oil for $24/gal from Mountain Rose Herbs ok for food use?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Yes, we use expeller pressed for food use, no problem!

    [Reply]

    Hannah Reply:

    I recently bought some refined from Mtn Rose Herbs for the first time, intending to use it for popcorn or just other foods where I did not want the coconut taste. Previously I had used both the unrefined and the expeller-pressed form Tropical Traditions.

    Then after noticing where it said “only for cosmetic use” I wrote to customer service. Here is what they replied:

    “We do not recommend the refined coconut oil for consumption. This is in most cases due to the fact that the facility where it was produced was not a food grade facility.

    I am aware that some people eat it, but I personally do not like it as it tastes no more flavorful than wax.

    If I were you I would use the *clearance unrefined oil* for your food purposes including popcorn, etc. and save the *refined* for your skin creations, etc.”

    I’m still not sure whether I’ll use it for food or not. But next time I’ll probably go for tee TT expeller-pressed. Hope this info helps.

    [Reply]

  25. Merry Jo says

    Funny thing: I was just making granola this morning (with coconut oil, of course), and I thought of you. :) I actually wanted to ask a question. I’ve used coconut oil to make a cake (specifically a Smith Island cake ~ a regional favorite here in MD ~ google it. It’s way cool! :) ). Anyways, maybe it’s because that cake is so thin, but when I added the (melted) coconut oil to my batter, it promptly hardened again (I guess because of the cold eggs), so it was little balls in the batter. And when it cooked, the balls melted and left little holes. I didn’t like that, so I ended up using other oil for my next batch. Any advice?

    [Reply]

    Abby Reply:

    I’ve had that problem a few times but I found that if you let your eggs (and butter for that m atter)come to room temperature before beginning your recipes the problem is alleviated.

    [Reply]

  26. Lisa says

    Thank you for the info! I am quite curious about this now. Also, by the time I was done reading this, the word “coconut” started to look really funny. Like when you say the same word aloud several times. Coconut. Coconut. Coconut. I feel a little nutty now ;-)

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Ugh, I felt that way after writing the word COCONUT so many times! :)

    [Reply]

  27. Christina says

    I am able to get Now Healthy Foods Organic Virgin Coconut Oil at our local health food store. It’s a 20 oz container for $11. I have used it to bake with at times (Makes a chocolate cake even more divine!), but currently am using it as a facial moisturizer and sometimes a body moisturizer.

    Wondering if anyone has used coconut oil as a hair moisturizer? I’m sitting here racking my brain to come up with a cost per quart/gallon from my 20 oz price, but I’m afraid I’ll have to check into it later. The price I give sounds kind of high. Of course, it’s alright for my usage, but if I was going to begin using it in cooking more, I’d need a better price!

    [Reply]

    Abby Reply:

    I have very damaged hair from pregnancy with my second child. Nothing seemed to help until I started using coconut oil. I use about a tablespoon for my (med. length) hair. Just work it through and leave it in for 2 hours (if you can stand it :)) then wash. It feels AMAZING! Just be sure to rinse with WARM water…not hot. It’s better for your hair.

    [Reply]

    Meredith McG Reply:

    Thanks Abby !! :) My husband has been begging me to grow my hair out, but it’s so dry that is splits and breaks. since our son has was born it’s been falling out in handfuls ( aaaaugh ! )I’ll definalty give this a try !

    [Reply]

  28. says

    also – azure standard has good prices for coconut oil – especially if you live in an area where you get azure deliveries without having to pay shipping costs.

    [Reply]

    Cassandra Reply:

    My two scents! We used to buy our coconut oil from Mountain Rose but them they changed their coconut oil provider and we didn’t like the color or taste. After much research I think that this coconut oil https://www.azurestandard.com/shop/product/8350/ is the best in everyway. Unrefined, organic, cold-pressed and made from FRESH coconuts. The mountain rose herb oil is made from dried coconuts that can harbor mold and bacteria. Using any coconut oil is certainly better than most fats out there but there are definately some brands that are VERY good for you and others that arn’t so great. The least processing is always best. This is what I look for in a coconut oil: Certified organic by USDA standards
    No refining
    No chemicals added (including hexane)
    No bleaching
    No deodorization
    No hydrogenation
    Made from traditional coconut palms only, no hybrid or genetically modified (GMO) varieties
    Made from fresh coconuts, not the dried “copra” used in cheap oils
    Made without heat processing

    and Nutivia is all of the above. I actually don’t notice the coconut taste in any of my cooking. But that’s just me :). Thanks for your site! I LOVE IT!

    [Reply]

    Sara B Reply:

    thanks for this!! I bought a refined oil because I will be giving it to my son who is 10 months old and some websites I read said that with unrefined oils you are more likely to get impurities in it. You know?

    [Reply]

  29. Amber Rogers says

    Thank you, Laura. Perfect timing as this has been on my mind. I use olive oil as much as possible, and use to use a bit of coconut oil in homemade baby formula, and once even made a pie crust with it which was delicious! But I have realized lately I should make the major switch and toss the canola oil. Maybe I will try the palm oil, too. Thanks for the info.
    Amber

    [Reply]

  30. Jolene says

    I just bought some coconut oil at Wal-mart because it was all i could afford and I was wondering if it was still better than using canola oil.Also what is the difference with the brand you buy and the coconut oil at Wal-mart.

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I’d say that the Walmart coconut oil is better than canola…so if that’s what you can use…go for it!

    [Reply]

  31. says

    How well does it work in icing if you sub it for the shortening? Your pic shows a shortening-like solid, which makes me think it would work, but the word “oil” makes me think of a liquid which would not work. Also, if it is semi-solid, how stable is it in warmer temps? Does it melt before or after butter?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I’ve never tried making frosting with it, but have used it to make pie crust (instead of shortening)> I’m not sure how it would work as a sub for shortening in frosting. It’s solid right now since my kitchen is cool. In the summer, it is usually melted in my pantry. I’d say it melts before butter, but I’ve never thought about it. I’ll have to put them side by side this summer to see which one melts faster!

    [Reply]

    Mkcoehoorn Reply:

    If it will turn to liquid in ambiant temps, then it probably won’t work too well in icing. I’m not crazy about making “buttercream” because in my experience I end up somewhere too warm and the butter either softens enough that the icing starts sliding off the cake or it separates from the icing and pools in any depressions in the icing – neither is very appetizing. But when I do a big project, using a cup of shortening per pound of powdered sugar gets a little… well its not very appetizing either. So I was thinking if coconut oil is as stable as shortening then I might make the switch for icing, but if it melts in summer heat then I don’t know that I want to risk the investment.

    [Reply]

  32. Margie says

    One tip I picked up somewhere is to store the bucket of coconut oil on top of the refrigerator in the cold months so it doesn’t get so rock solid, and in a cool cabinet during the warm months so it doesn’t liquify. I have found that this makes it easy to scoop into a measuring cup.
    One other thing – this may sound strange, but a wonderful treat is chicken fried in unrefined coconut oil. It doesn’t taste like coconut, but the flavor is wonderful! And popcorn, oh my!!

    [Reply]

  33. gina says

    Thank you Laura for the post! I have just really started to follow you a few weeks ago, and just finished reading the book form tropical traditions. I was just a little over whelmed on where to get started, but your post was great and answered a lot of my questions! Thank you! Also, your site has been such an encouragement to my husband and I as we are trying to eat more whole foods. And for the first time, he has LOVED eating healthy because your recipes are so good!:)

    [Reply]

  34. says

    I finally got my coconut oil from Tropical Traditions! Soooo excited to use it, but will introduce it slowly (thanks to everyone who warned me for that!!). Had a question though. The gallon bucket is SO hard to get into. Can I transfer some into a mason jar and keep refilling that?

    [Reply]

    Doug Reply:

    Yes

    [Reply]

  35. says

    You can get Coconut oil for a GREAT price at swansonvitamins.com, and they sell a hexane free version. I think they sell a half gallon jar? But you could always buy two and I think it’s STILL cheaper that way. Plus swanson always has promo codes and free/reduced shipping offers:)

    [Reply]

  36. CH (COL) Jeff Burnsed (Ret) says

    Coconut oil is stellar…healthy…packed with energy..and a true blessing from the Lord :) Thank you for your website :)

    Have a blessed Easter

    in Jesus name

    Jeff

    [Reply]

  37. says

    I have just recently started using coconut oil with my little boy! He loves it in his food and I just recently used it on a contact rash that started looking better immediately! I am a huge fan thus far! I just have a bit my friend gave me, but I need to stock up on some more!

    [Reply]

  38. Rhonda says

    Do you find that baking with coconut oil changes the texture of cookies? When I used it for a cookie recipe, the cookies had a crunchy texture rather than a chewy texture as they had when made with oil.

    I’ve read that coconut oil is much better to fry with because it doesn’t “oxidize” (I think that’s the term) at higher temperatures like other oils do and become unhealthy for us. So that movie theater popcorn fried in coconut oil was really much better for us!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I rarely use coconut oil for cookies for that reason. Butter keeps them softer, for sure! And yes, coconut oil does just fine for frying – it does not lose it’s health benefits one bit!

    [Reply]

  39. Rachel C. says

    Is all virgin organic coconut oil ok? I found some at Jedwards International that’s around $34 /gal. Just wanted to make sure I can trust it’s quality at such a good price. Love your websight by the way!

    [Reply]

    LindseyforLaura@HHM Reply:

    Thanks! That is a great choice for coconut oil. :)

    [Reply]

  40. Amy says

    I also use coconut oil and have for some time. I have coconut and olive oil in my house, nothing else. Nutiva is my personal favorite…..amazon has good prices, but the Nutiva website also has great prices and sales. Lately they have been doing a 24 hour Tuesday only sale and it varies from week to week. Sometimes the coconut oil is part of that sale. They also offer free shipping over $30 all the time.

    Many grat suggestions and uses mentioned here. I use it for cooking and for skin. I use it in my hair one or two times a month. I usually put it in before bed and sleep in it. I just make sure to cover my pillow with a thick towel.

    One of my other favorite uses that I didn’t see mentioned…..I use it as an altnative to butter on some things. My favorite is on bread for grilled cheese. It is a great way to get the oil in your diet and it makes them taste wonderful.

    For those looking for mor information about coconut oil, the best resource I found in one place is a book by Bruce Fife, The Coconut Oil Miracle. It covers many of its various benefits, but is presented in a way that most people can understand.

    [Reply]

    Rachel Reply:

    I heard you can also use white vinegar and coconut oil in a spray and spray it it around the edges of your ceiling and floor boards to keep spiders out of your house.

    [Reply]

  41. Karen says

    I need to ask a really dumb question! Is the coconut oil I purchased to make soap with the same coconut oil I could use to cook with? I ordered a 7# pail from a soap-making supplier and have made soap with it only once so far. I also have a little bitty jar of coconut oil for cooking I bought through a co-op I order from. I cannot seem to figure out it they are the same or not. Sorry for the dumb question!

    Karen

    [Reply]

    LindseyforLaura@HHM Reply:

    That’s not a dumb question at all! You can cook with both. I’ll include a link to a post Laura did that explains it a little better.
    http://heavenlyhomemakers.com/what-to-do-with-coconut-oil
    http://heavenlyhomemakers.com/what-we-did-to-help-our-sons-eczema-without-drugs

    [Reply]

  42. Karen Dee Davidson says

    I LOVE coconut oil. Love the taste. The price keeps me from using it more. However, with the help of my Heavenly Homemaker, I will be able to find better prices. Thank you! And, of course, there’s always the hope of winning the gallon! :). Has anyone out there tried the Now brand? It is aweful. Don’t know if I got a bad jar or if it’s just the way it is. Does anyone know? Thus far I have been buying the Spectrum. Going to start ordering it.

    [Reply]

  43. Tracey says

    Our family has grown to love coconut oil over the years- especially tasty in morning pancakes and yeast free breads!

    [Reply]

  44. crystal garcia says

    Would love to try it dont have the money for it right now so it would be wonderful to win that gallon : )

    [Reply]

  45. Amanda says

    After reading under the How to measure Coconut oil, I am wondering if coconut oil comes as a solid and you have to melt? Excuse my dumb question!

    [Reply]

    LindseyforLaura@HHM Reply:

    Not a dumb question at all!!! Yes, it does come as a solid and you melt it.

    [Reply]

    Kristin Reply:

    Coconut oil melts at 76 degrees, anything below that and it is a solid. It is best to have coconut oil in a liquid state for baking (melt and measure). Just be careful that your other baking ingredients are room temperature or warmer as well or your coconut oil might re-solidify while while stirring.

    [Reply]

  46. Cami says

    If you can’t afford to buy the mentioned brands of coconut oil (from my research on some of the brands, prices our out of our budget), wouldn’t it be okay to use a lesser quality brand rather than go to using the other oils (i.e., canola, vegetable, corn)? What’s your opinion?

    [Reply]

    LindseyforLaura@HHM Reply:

    Yes. It is better to use a lesser quality brand than the other kinds of oils.

    [Reply]

  47. Christina says

    Hi everyone. You’ve been very helpful with your comments and such. I wasn’t sure if you’re aware you can also put a tsp of coconut oil in your pets food to help your furry child maintain a healthy digestion and skin and coat. My cat developed an allergic reaction to fleas which in tirn made her fur fall out in tufts and nothing I was doing was working. I flea bombed our apt. Constantly vacuumed. Put antibiotic
    ointment on the sores. It wasn’t getting better, then a friend suggested coconut oil on her skin and in her food. She’ happier and healthier now.

    [Reply]

  48. Jerry says

    Thank You for all GOOD Comments !! I am a professional Dog trainer/Handler …sounds
    good for dogs too !!!I will try and let you know!

    I am going to check into imunity factor.

    SMILE HAVE A GREAT DAY

    Jerry

    [Reply]

  49. catherine D says

    I was wondering if anyone could tell me the top brands to look for? Is betterbody foods extra virgin organic coconut oil the same as Nutiva? Thx in advance!!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Tropical Traditions is my favorite brand, but Nutiva and Vitacost brands are really high quality too. I’ve not heard of Betterbody foods, so not sure!

    [Reply]

  50. says

    We often use Nutiva, but there are several good brands.

    One snack we like to have at home with our kids is homemade popcorn (using coconut oil).

    Best wishes!

    [Reply]

  51. says

    I heard you can use coconut oil for head lice is this true? And if so how do you do it?

    [Reply]

    Alli Reply:

    Yes, oil suffocates the bugs and helps loosen the eggs. Coat hair from scalp to ends with coconut oil and or olive oil. Leave on for at least half an hour (overnight is great). Then wash hair with hair with tea tree oil and shampoo followed by an apple cider vinegar rinse. Do this once or twice a day till the problem is gone plus a day or two. There are other things you can do but this is a great place to start!

    [Reply]

  52. Khadijah Leavy says

    I have acne on my back and on my arms if i use the coconut oil on my skin will it help?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    It’s sure worth a try!

    [Reply]

  53. Jennifer Hunter says

    Can I just take the coconut oil, or only in foods, I would like to be able to just take it like a supplement??

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Yes, you can take a spoonful or two as a supplement – it’s great for you! You can stir it into your coffee if you like – that’s a great way to get it down. :)

    [Reply]

  54. says

    You are the one who is responsible for my love of coconut oil. Thank you! I use both types, actually. I love the coconut flavor for waffles, muffins, salmon cakes, popcorn etc. I use the plain for hamburger buns, stir-fry, and other things that I don’t want to have a coconut flavor. I try to keep both on hand at all times. I love that it has a long shelf life. Thanks for the great info!

    [Reply]

  55. Karen Dee says

    My friend says she just bought a bottle of liquid coconut oil. Is anyone familiar with this and do you think it has the same benefits?

    [Reply]

    LindseyforLaura@HHM Reply:

    I am unaware of any liquid coconut oil. In my experience the only reason it is liquid is because of temperature. I would think that it is probably the same as other coconut oil, it may have just liquefied in the jar because it got too warm. I could be wrong…but that is my best guess.

    [Reply]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *