What to Do With Butternut Squash

I did not grow up eating butternut squash (or any kind of squash for that matter). I hadn’t a clue what to do with one until a few years ago. They are, in fact, quite yummy. But here’s the most exciting thing about a butternut squash:

You can use a butternut squash to make a pumpkin pie. Or pumpkin bars. Or pumpkin pie pecan squares. Or just about any pumpkin treat.

It tastes exactly the same in a recipe and no one can tell a difference. 

Just for the record, I’m not trying to be deceitful by switching out the ingredients…just trying to use up what I have and I think it’s cool that these ingredients are interchangeable! I will say that using squash to make a “pumpkin pie” sounds a little silly because a squash is not a pumpkin…but calling it a squash pie just doesn’t even sound good. And so I will continue to use squash to make pumpkin pies and I will continue to call it a pumpkin pie and everyone will continue to eat it because it is so good.

But first, let’s talk about how to prepare a butternut squash. There are other ways to make pureed squash, but here’s the easiest way I’ve found:

First, cut your gourd in half. Or close to half.  Mine usually end up being quite lop sided. 

Use a wooden or a heavy duty metal spoon to scrape out the seeds and stringy stuff.

Place your squash face up in a baking dish and bake, uncovered for at least an hour at 350° or until your house smells squashy and you can poke a fork into your squash very easily. See, look at the fork pokes:

Use a spoon to scoop out all the soft, cooked squash. You can eat it just like it is…you can sprinkle sucanat on it, you can butter it, you can salt it. It’s very tasty eaten in these ways.

Or…you can puree it. Place all the scooped out cooked squash into a food processor or blender.

Process for just a few seconds until smooth.

Look, pureed squash:

Now you can feed it to your baby, feed it to your grown ups…or you can make these Sweet Potato Streusel Muffins. Yep, not only can you make a Pumpkin Pie and other pumpkin treats with squash, you can make Sweet Potato Muffins. Is this getting confusing yet?

Just last week I made a delicious “Pumpkin Pie” with butternut squash. My father-in-law was still here at the time and he declared it the best pumpkin pie he’d ever had. In fact, he declared it the first pumpkin pie he’d ever LIKED. {grin}

Are you squash eaters at your house? How do you like your squash? Ever used squash to make something that calls for pumpkin or sweet potatoes?

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Comments

  1. Carrie says

    We had butternut squash for the first time this year with our CSA. We baked it with our cut up potatoes, carrots and onions and everyone liked it.

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  2. Jamie says

    I’m with your father-in-law on the pumpkin pie thing…maybe I could actually eat it if it was, um, actually squash! :)

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  3. Phil says

    I’m not much of a squash or pumpkin eater, but I do enjoy sweet potatoes. My wife, however is a pumpkin pie addict, so we’ll see whether she approves of the substitution.

    One small note on the pumpkin pie recipe you linked… The doubled recipe at the bottom is missing a newline between salt and butter. I did a double take when I saw that 5 T butter doubled is somehow 2 T butter. But then I read closer and saw the extra stick of butter in there.

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  4. Marianne says

    I’m the same as you, never had it growing up. Had it for the first time a couple weeks ago when a friend shared from her garden- baked with brown sugar yum! I will be sure to try one of your recipes here

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  5. Gina says

    I will have to try using squash, I can’t say I’ve ever made it! My hubby isn’t a pumpkin pie fan so maybe he would like this, or maybe I could use it for a sweet potato pie recipe!!?

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  6. Cheryl says

    We actually learned last year (when there seemed to be a pumpkin shortage, hence a canned pumpkin shortage) that the canneries actually use this type of squash to make their canned pumpkin puree and pie filling.

    Do you keep squash seeds and bake them like pumpkin seeds?

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  7. Sabrina says

    I’m a big fan of pumpkin pie! And especially homemade crust :) And I’ve roasted other seeds just like pumpkin and they turn out yummy!

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  8. Jessie Chilson says

    I cooked SO much pumpkin one year, we vowed NEVER to do it again! We were SICK of it! I cooked close to 4 or maybe 5 pumpkins……

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  9. says

    Yep, we like squash ~ especially butternut since you get more meat for your efforts =)
    The squash you have pictured looks especially nice!
    Thanks for the reminder to DO something with the two boxes of squash in the garage… ‘one’ of the things my son grew in HIS garden this summer.
    And yes, we also substitute in recipes amongst the yellow veggies without much complaint.

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  10. Sheila says

    I have several squash here but I thought it would be for soup and roasted squash; however, I now think I will be looking for pumpkin recipes to try your trick.
    Have you used it to make pumpkin pancakes?

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  11. Courtney says

    We eat lots of butternut squash soup – so delicious!

    Every fall, I stock my freezer with squash puree. I cook it in the crockpot – just cut your squash in half (or quarters or whatever fits in your crockpot), remove seeds and then toss the squash in with a little bit of water and some salt and pepper. No need to peel the squash. Cook on high for 4 hours or low for 8 hours, then scoop the flesh out with a spoon, give it a quick whirl in the food processor and divide up into freezer bags. It is so convenient to just grab a bag of puree out of the freezer whenever a recipe calls for it.

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  12. Fiddlesticks says

    I just bought a butternut squash this week in an effort to expand our possible likes. I was looking for recipes and am just planning on roasting it. But if we don’t like it plain roasted, I have all sorts of things I can do with the puree!

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  13. Melodya says

    We LOVE butternut squash soup and butternut squash rolls. I am guessing the rolls are like potato bread recipes? Delicious.

    We bake the seeds just like pumpkin seeds.

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    Melodya Reply:

    our butternut soup consists of: Butternut squash soup

    onion, butter, peeled and cubed butternut squash, broth, dried marjoram, ground black pepper, ground cayenne pepper, cream cheese.

    [Reply]

  14. Allison says

    Mmmm! Last year I made homemade pumpkin puree and it was the first time I’ve really enjoyed pumpkin pie! We’ll have to try this now. :)

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  15. Rachel B says

    This is timely! I have a bunch of butternut squash that was given to me and needed some creative ideas for using it over the next few months. It’s SO good in multiple forms! We love it! Thanks for a couple of new ideas!

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  16. Christy says

    Thank you SO much for putting these tutorials up! Some of us have NO idea what to do with a squash, or other “healthy” item because we were never raised doing it (and sometimes it is the most basic information that is the hardest to come by!). Thanks!

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  17. Deanna says

    We love butternut squash! I substitute it for the pumpkin in pumpkin cookies. The kids loved it. Never thought of using it for pie. Could be interesting!!!

    [Reply]

  18. says

    What great ideas! I love cooking with pumpkin, but sometimes it’s a little pricey. I do however have 5 butternut squash in the garage from our garden this year! :)

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  19. Nicole Brewer says

    We love sweet potatoes and I probably cook them too often so I am really excited to finally know what to do with butternut squash! Can’t wait to try all your recipes :)

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  20. Jessica says

    Butternut Squash is one of my favorite foods. I love it as a replacement in baked goods, or eaten plain. But my favorite way is with pasta. I like to make a simple white sauce with butter, flour and milk, and then add in semi-pureed butternut squash (I like a few chunks rather than completely pureed). Flavor the sauce with some nutmeg and lots of sage and mix together with any kind of pasta.

    You can also make butternut squash lasagna. One layer lasagna noodles, one pureed squash with sage layer, one simple white sauce with parsley layer, and one mozzarella cheese layer. Keep alternating until the pan is full and bake just like you would any other lasagna. :)

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  21. Jennifer says

    I’ve grown butternut squash in my garden the past 3 years. It always reseeds and my garden is covered with squash plants. I substitute for pumpkin as well. I’ve made squash muffins, cookies, pancakes and waffles. My family also likes butternut squash fries.

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  22. says

    Very timely post as someone just gave me the biggest butternut squash that I have ever seen. Did you also know that you can combine your winter squashes (for example: pumpkin, butternut, buttercup, and or sweet potato squash) into a crock pot and get the best ever “pumpkin pie? It won a contest last year for the best pie.

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  23. teresa says

    I grew up eating squash pie, but yes we do call it pumpkin pie. We use buttercup squash to make our squash/pumpkin pie. It is so yummy. When I was pregnant with my first baby, my dad told me to eat a piece of the squash/pumpkin pie and I would go in to labor. He was right! About seven hours later my water broke.

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  24. Katie says

    Since Pumpkins are in the squash family, it makes perfect since that it could be interchangeable.
    We eat lots of squash in our house. MY favorite is spaghetti squash!

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  25. Leah says

    we love butternut squash, but we always want to have some leftover after the meal to make squash bread braid and all sorts of yummy “pumpkin” recipes!

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  26. Emily says

    I know you don’t use a microwave, but for those who do, just pierce w/ a fork a few times and microwave for about 10 minutes and you’ll be able to slice through it very easily… then proceed with baking it as you described. I always do this because they are so hard to cut through otherwise!

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  27. Danielle says

    why did i never think to cut my butternut squash with an electric knife like you did? thanks for the tip! the squash is also yummy pureed with butter and maple syrup!

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  28. Jamie Swenson says

    Squash is super delicious stirred in with your regular mashed potatoes!

    A new recipe I have discovered and that my daughter even requested to take to school for lunch is this squash soup that would fall into your high five recipe category if you don’t count the salt and pepper.

    Roast your squash (drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper) with onions and a head of garlic, puree them all together and thin with chicken stock to your desired consistency. So easy and so yummy!

    [Reply]

  29. Danielle says

    Wow, I was given several butternut squash a few weeks ago and was just thinking today that I needed to use them up. The thought had actually occurred to me that maybe I could use them in some pumpkin recipes and here you are telling me how to do it! Wonderful ideas. Thank you so much!

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  30. Beth says

    No butternut squash in Asia, but some really great funky shaped pumpkin. My husband didn’t like pumpkin until we had to make it ourselves and not out of a can. It’s amazing what fresh ingredients do to your taste buds. Now he can’t get enough of my pumpkin bread!

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  31. says

    I had never tried butternut squash until I started making baby food and I was shocked at how good it was!

    I haven’t tried subbing it and I am loyal to my pumpkin so I don’t know if I could sub squash even though it would taste the same. I would however use it instead of sweet potato.

    I wonder what a butternut squash smoothie would taste like. ?????

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  32. karen says

    We just had butternut squash for dinner! Sprinkled with brown sugar–yum. Scoop out the seeds with your ice cream scooper, the sharp edge makes it super easy.

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  33. Serena says

    I love butternut squash and I love substituting it for pumpkin. I’ve used homemade puree in place of canned pumpkin for pumpkin bread. It’s just as good, if not better! I also will add the puree to soups, eggs, quiche, pretty much anything I can throw it into to fortify it.

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  34. Laura says

    Mmmm, we just had roasted butternut squash with dinner last night. I’ll consider it for sweet potato recipes as my dd is intolerant to sweet potatoes, but not butternut squash.

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  35. Julie G says

    I’ve only tried to cook butternut squash once…I had no idea what to do with it. I just served it plain…no one really liked it. I think they would like the pumpkin bars made with it though. Thanks!

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  36. Rebecca says

    I like how you talk about it being ready when your house smells squashy lol. I always tell my husband I know something is done when I can smell it from the other room!
    I have not tried butternut squash yet, but as soon as this rain lets up I am hoping to get some from the farmers. I have two acorn squashes that I got dirt cheap at the store, but I am not sure if I can use them the same way?
    I did not grow up eating squash either, so I see all these different varieties and have no clue what to do with them lol.

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  37. Robyn O. says

    Yum! I had an abundance of squash from the garden this summer and started substituting it for pumpkin in all my pumpkin recipes and no one noticed. I chopped, cooked, pureed and froze more of it than I care to remember and will be using it all winter to “pumpkinize” my recipes. Also–I really love your pie crust recipe. The pie photo reminded me of it. I made the mini-apple breakfast pies, but I substituted peaches because I had 80 pounds of them and they were fabulous. I served them to my parents last weekend while they were visiting and my mom asked me to make full sized ones for Thanksgiving using the whole wheat pie crust recipe. Thanks for another great recipe!

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  38. Teri says

    Laura, I really enjoyed this cooking tip. I grew up eating squash of all kinds! And love them all. Besides using butternut squash for “pumpkin” pie or other goodies, I also bake banana squash, puree and use in all my pumpkin recipes. I started using squash in place of pumpkin years ago when we had lots of extra winter squash from our garden. :) I haven’t bought canned pumpkin in years and prefer to use pureed squash. I have also used hubbard squash but we haven’t grown it for several years. Sometimes, when we have extra pumpkins in the garden, I will cook them and then mix pumpkin and squash puree together. We serve it as a vegetable dish and I use it for all my pumpkin recipes. YUM! I think acorn squash would also work but we always just bake them and serve with butter and brown sugar. Oh, one more thing I do with squash puree – I add it to my homemade spaghetti sauce. And chunks of squash can be added to vegetable soup or beef stew. Thanks for all the great comments!

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    Theresa C Reply:

    Wow, adding it to beef stew sounds delish!

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  39. says

    I love squash, and have 3 in my refrigerator right now (they’re one of my baby’s favorite foods as well). I’ve never tried it as a substitution, but now you have me thinking. I’m wondering how butternut squash cheesecake would be.

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  40. says

    My children love butternut squash when I serve it as a side mixed like mashed potatoes – with cream/butter, cinnamon, honey or natural brown sugar, and salt. It is a little like eating pumpkin pie without the shell, :-). My husband likes it, too. I use the leftovers in muffins the next morning. And I have found that putting a bit of water in the bottom of the pan when baking makes it cook faster.

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  41. Brighid says

    World’s simplest way to cook your squash. Wash and dry the squash. Put in your slow cooker. Add a tablespoon of water, set it to low and when the squash is soft, turn the slow cooker off. It’ll take anywhere from 3-6 hours. (If you check a lot, you might have to add another tablespoon of water.)

    Then when it’s cool, you can scoop it out for soup, baby food, etc.

    [Reply]

    mamma2j Reply:

    you don’t even cut it in half??? That is the worst part of preparing squash!

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  42. Lisa H. says

    Quite frankly, I think squash makes better pumpkin pie than pumpkin. It is so much more buttery than pumpkin, richer and more velvety. I have never made a pumpkin pie, but tasted quite a few and I am always glad to come home to my squash pie (try it sweetened with maple syrup…. heavenly!) topped with homemade whipped cream (also sweetened with maple syrup…. sorry, I am a New Englander!)and it just can’t be surpassed for smoothness, and depth of flavor!
    Oh, and don’t forget to save the seeds! Just rinse them, let them air dry (spread them out on a paper towel) and enjoy them as a delicious snack, or roast them in a very low oven with or without sea salt, onion powder,…
    Or, you can also save the seeds (rinse and air dry) to plant them in your garden next year(especially if they have been grown locally and are not some strange hybrid). We’ve done this for years and the seeds will eventually adapt to your climate over the years and produce wonderful squashes! Can you tell I love butternut squash?

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  43. Nicole S. says

    Thanks for sharing this tip! I’ve always been a little intimidated by squash, but I think I’ll give it a try!

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  44. says

    I’m also a use it up girl and didn’t grow up eating squash much at all. I am sneaking acorn squash (not my favorite) into things this year as we were gifted with 19 of them from a volunteer plant at my friend’s mother’s house. Love those volunteers…there were about 30 squashes growing wild in the pasture!

    Heather

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  45. says

    I discovered a recipe for a Squash Bread this fall. Its so delicious and it doesn’t taste like squash – the squash just makes it nice and light bread. Very delicious. I also found a recipe for squash fries- baked in the oven. Similar to sweet potatoe fries, I imagine. Going to give that a try. Yummy!

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  46. Kristin says

    I love butternut squash. I have a recipe for bread that includes almond butter and butternut squash. No flour!

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  47. Joanna says

    Wow, I never considered subbing squash for pumpkin in a pie. Now I’ve GOT to try it. (Love it when I’m just “forced” to make dessert:)

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  48. Christine says

    Need to try this veggie again… It’s so pretty and tastes good, if prepared correctly! I bought a fresh one and cut my hand slicing it, so I was afraid to try it again. So, I bought it already chopped and frozen, but it didn’t have much flavor. Wouldn’t this make a gorgeous soup?! I saw on a different cooking website that you can bake a whole spaghetti squash, then cut it, so it’s easier to manage… May try that with a butternut squash and see how it turns out!

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  49. Jami says

    Yum! Who knew! We love butternut squash soup! It’s getting colder and can’t wait to start making yummy soup! Would love to win an ebook!

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  50. Erin says

    I have often made pureed squash for baby but I never thought of using it for muffins and such. Thanks for sharing.

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  51. Kate M. says

    I use my butternut squash in soup. I cut it in half, peel the skin, scoop out the inside then cut up into 1 inch squares. Then cook an onion in a pan with some butter (yum!) add 2-4 cups chicken broth (depends on the size of your squash), and add the squash. Cover and turn heat to simmer. Cook until squash is tender. Then add a little salt, peper, and nutmeg. Puree in blender till smooth put back in pot and add a little milk or sour cream & ENJOY! We love this soup because its healthy and hearty goes great with a big piece of crunchy bread!

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  52. Jenny says

    LOVE the squashy smell of the house comment! Perfect way to describe it. I’ve recently been trying soup recipes with squash. My boys loved it as babies, but I have to get them back to lovin’ it now. It might take a few trys but I”m not giving up. It’s so good and so good for you.

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  53. Rita Troyer says

    Thought I would make a comment on how I cook my squash….I peel it like Kate M does it, but then I put it in a steam basket inside a kettle and put plenty of water in the kettle and let it steam away! It only takes about 1/2 hour till it is nice and tender enough to puree.
    And here is the best souffle recipe:!
    2 cups cooked squash (or pumpkin, or carrot)
    3eggs
    1/2 cup sugar of your choice
    3 Tbsp. flour
    1 tsp. baking powder
    1/4 to 1/2 cup butter (depends if you are on a diet :)
    1tsp vanilla, and if you like, almond flavoring
    1/2 tsp salt
    Blend this all up in your blender, and bake at 350 for 35min.
    ( You can also separate the eggs and beat the egg whites, and then add them for a fluffier souffle, but I have never done that.)
    Hope you try it and enjoy it!

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  54. Elaine says

    I love squash in recipes! When I have tried to bake a pumpkin to make a real pumpkin pie, it is not the same, it needs to be cooked down for a thicker consistency. Squash is so easy, bake and puree into recipes. We made “pumpkin muffins” yesterday.

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  55. Carissa White says

    I love winter squash. Soups, stews, adding it in chili for a little sweetness is just wonderful. And who doesn’t like the idea of having a veggie as a sweet treat?

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  56. says

    Yum! We love butternut squash! We tried a new (to us) squash this year – seminole squash – it was so delicious, too! It could also easily be subbed for butternut, pumpkin, or sweet potato.

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  57. Stephanie says

    I love acorn and butternut squash. They are so good for you. My favorite thing to do with them is to puree it and sneak it into sauces (think Mac and Cheese, spaghetti and pizza). It bulks up the sauces at little effort and cost, plus it adds vitamins and minerals and no one is the wiser.
    Of course I’m honest when they ask what’s in it but if they don’t ask it’s just my little secret!

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  58. Theresa C says

    I am loving reading through all the comments here!!! What great ideas! I have never thought to use butternut squash as a replacement to pumpkin, as I just use an organic canned pumpkin that is inexpensive!! Two toddlers will do that to you ;)
    BUT, I love to make butternut squash soup. It is SO good. I just cook some onion til soft, add chicken stock (about 3-4 cups)then some minced garlic. To that I add baked butternut squash that I scoop out(slightly cooled so I don’t burn myself!)I add sea salt and nutmeg to taste and some good quality cream and blend w/an immersion blender. You could use a regular blender too. Sorry I don’t have time to measure much! I think I’ll some up tonight tho!

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  59. Amanda says

    I’ve been stuck on using my squash for soup – with some carrots, onion, cream cheese, and spices. But it’s good to know that there are so many other great uses! :)

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  60. Aya says

    We aren’t big fans of squash, but I’ll have to try some in our baked goods. It might just pass the taste tests then!

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  61. Dana says

    I love summer squash, but have never tried winter squash. My husband can’t stand the yellow crookneck I love, but he does like pumpkin. Maybe I can sneak it by him. :-)

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  62. Kimberley H says

    This post’s timing was perfect! I just bought two butternut squash at the store yesterday… figured I wanted to do something with it. I know it is healthy and wanted to try and eat it more often. This is great! Now I have something to do with these 2 butternut squash! I love all the recipes (and helpful tips) you share – I have tried quite a few of them, and still have more to do. We have enjoyed all those we have tried. I love your website and so enjoy reading your posts! Keep it up! Thank you for sharing!

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  63. Christina says

    I would love your pumpkin pie recipe. It’s so close to Thanksgiving and I love to make the family a special treat for after dinner.

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  64. mamma2j says

    YUUUUUM, I love squash of any kind! I make risotto using butternut squash & mushrooms, and soon I’ll be making baby food for my little one with it!

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  65. says

    My family is not a big fan of squash, but I think they will eat like this. I have 6 sitting on my porch, so i know what I am going to be doing with it. thanks!!!

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  66. Danielle says

    I just got done cooking up 5 butternut squash and pureeing it. I now have the equivalent of about 9 cans of pumpkin ready to go for baking! I am so excited to try it.

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  67. Sara says

    You can cook up carrots and mash them and use them just as you would pumpkin as well…especially helpful since I have a surplus of garden carrots and the deer ate my pumpkins. :)

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  68. Carla says

    DS2 was looking over my shoulder while I was reading this post, he said, “Mom , you are not going to do that are you?!?” lol, He may never know. ;-)

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  69. says

    I’d never had butternut squash until this weekend. I was at a farmer’s market and tried some homemade butternut squash soup {under duress} and it was so amazingly wonderful that I bought a jar. I plan to indulge in it one day this week for lunch and then find a recipe so I can make it myself.
    Who’d have thought I was a squash person?!?

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  70. Christina says

    Okay…I admit that I am guilty of never preparing squash for my family (except as pureed baby food)! I look forward to trying this ‘new’ veg and hope everyone likes it (and hope my three year old doesn’t ask!) :)

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  71. Michelle says

    Yum–I am going to have to make sure I cook and freeze some of the squash I have before it goes bad. Then I can make puffin muffins without having to buy the can!

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  72. says

    We used to eat “squash pie” when I was a kid. We grew lots of squash, but not pumpkins. Nobody complained in our house. I think it tastes much better than canned pumpkin. I tried it on my husband once after we married and he said it was pretty good (that’s a compliment).

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  73. says

    We eat lots of squash. One of my favorites is squash diced into cubes, sauteed in garlic butter and tossed with noodles and herbs. Super yummy.

    [Reply]

    JANE Reply:

    I realize this is an old post, but can you tell me if the squash is cooked before you cube it or do you saute it raw? Thanks!
    -Jane

    [Reply]

    Kristina Reply:

    I would say cooked first

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  74. Heather Eide says

    I LOVE squash and have about 20 of them sitting in my front entry waiting to be turned into baby food and tasty treats. Thanks for some more ideas!

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  75. Carmen says

    We actually prefer “squash” pie to pumpkin. We currently have over 1/2 dozen butternuts hanging out in our garage. I really need to process them and freeze or can.

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  76. Lisa says

    We love butternut squash. Last week I made soup-Gingered butternut squash and pear soup. So good. We also eat it with butter or even plain. Haven’t cooked other things with it much, but I’m excited to try out some new recipes.

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  77. AmyR says

    Drool… I love pumpkin, butternut squash and sweet potatoes. Some of the things I like most about fall! Always afraid I’m going to cut off a hand cutting my squash in two, though!

    [Reply]

    thecatzpajamas Reply:

    I never cut them in half. they cook just fine if you throw the
    whole thing in the oven & cook it until the fork goes in easily.
    about an hour, depending on the size of your squash.
    pull it out with oven mits on, and then cut it in half to de-seed it.

    way easier. :)

    [Reply]

  78. Charlotte Moore says

    Has anyone heard of cushaw or kershaw, a winter squash? A friend gave my husband some seeds and he planted 5 hills. Had no idea what they were. They were green and white striped and we got 24 I think. The smallest was 4 lbs, and the largest weighed 18.5 lbs. Almost all of them weighed around 12-14 lbs. I have made souffle, muffins, a cake, and bread. I grated it for the cake and muffins, but cooked it for the other. I froze several packs. It taste similar to pumpkin and sweet potato. It is the hardest thing to cut I have ever seen.

    [Reply]

    Beth Reply:

    I think it’s called a Crenshaw squash. I’ve had it before and just used
    it like I would butternut, pumpkin, or sweet potatoes.

    [Reply]

    Charlotte Moore Reply:

    I have heard of those too. There is a cushaw or kershaw depending where you live I guess. I went online and read about it.

    [Reply]

  79. Lorinda says

    My Grandma used to make “pumpkin” pie with squash a lot. I’ve found that cooking butternut and acorn squash face up, smeared with butter and then enough parchment paper to cover the exposed flesh has better flavor. Just be sure the parchment paper doesn’t touch any part of the oven. I’ve even prepared the squash, using
    parchment paper,in the toaster oven.

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  80. Rebecca says

    Squash pie has been my favorite ever since I was a little girl. My mother always called it squash pie, but I guess that could sound gross if you don’t already know how delicious it is!

    Pureed butternut squash was a favorite baby food of both my boys.

    Butternut squash soup is mighty tasty, too!

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  81. Mandy says

    I add 2-4 T of squash to chocolate chip cookies, makes them moist and chewy, just don’t add too much, the taste will come through ;O)

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  82. says

    I’ve never made butternut squash, but I think I would add it to a sweet potato soup for added nutrients! I do love yellow squash and have to find enticing ways to get my hubby to eat it.

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  83. april says

    I’m a vegetarian. I live with carnivores. Finding ways to create meals we all can eat without resorting to dual meals is a real plus. Thanks for the visual layout to using this wonderful vegetable! Beta Carotene – another great plus!

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  84. says

    Baked is sooooo good! An easy way for me is to cut into chunks and steam for a few min in my little steamer basket. So quick and easy to peel and puree with no waste (except the skin). Then I puree and use to bake or as a cream soup substitute in recpies. Makes a great base for my faux potato soup too! I love fall!

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  85. says

    I would never have thought of using the squash instead of pumpkin – but now I’m so excited about trying this!

    This is off-topic, but I made your homemade vanilla wafers this morning – delicious!! Now I want to try the cheese crackers as well.

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  86. Christine says

    Another idea for cooking the squash, which I haven’t used specifically for butternut, but have used for acorn. Is stab the squash a few times and bake till done, let it cool to touch then cut, seed and peel. Maybe I’m lazy, but I really dislike cutting uncooked squash.

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  87. Angela says

    I used squash to make my pumpkin waffles this last time and they were better tasting. I use what I happen to have on hand, instead of buying pumpkin, squash or sweet potato when a recipe calls for one, it just makes life easier!

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  88. Heather says

    Not sure if anyone made this suggestion but if you take the squash, pierce it with a fork and put it in an oven at 400 degrees for 15 minutes then let it cool, it is way easier to deal with. Then you can cut it in pieces, etc.

    My favorite recipe = butternut squash ravioli stew

    Also, i heard a rumor that canned pumpkin is actually canned butternut squash. I wonder if this is on snopes.com….

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  89. Yvonna says

    Laura, I have little picky eaters. Must have taken after me because with milk & other allergies and serious seasonal + asthma…. I was shocked to hear the following from my 8 yr. old son. “That sure is a yummy looking pumkin pie.” When I told him what it was he said, “That sure is a yummy looking butter squash pie.” Told him thats the first and he said, “when you gonna make it?” :D Blessing’s

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  90. Rebekah says

    Just made this yesterday with a spaghetti squash from our garden at the same time. Unfortunately I didn’t care for the overall taste of the butternut (I have before), so I’ll make some muffins out of them! Thanks for the recipes!

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  91. says

    I made a whole bunch of squash puree a few years ago and froze it – this is a good reminder that I need to get to cooking with it! We definitely prefer it savory as a side dish, and I need to do more experimenting with ways to serve it as such.

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  92. Amy S. says

    Our favorite butternut squash recipe is butternut squash soup (recipe on allrecipes.com). If you haven’t tried it and you love butternut squash, you really must try it!!

    Also, I haven’t cubed and peeled my squashes for years since I discovered the roasting method. However I do it a little differently–I place it face down in a baking dish, then fill with about an inch of water. I then bake it at 400 for about 40 minutes. Always turns out perfect–whereas when I roast it face up it doesn’t always cook completely for me. I’m going to try this method with my pie pumpkins this year too!

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    Rebecca Reply:

    Amy, I used that method on a pie pumpkin to make pumpkin bread just this morning! I cut the pumpkin in half, placed it face down in 1/2″ of water, and baked it @ 350 for 45 mins. It was perfect! After I took it out of the oven, the pumpkins sank down as they cooled, lol.

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  93. Amanda says

    Ooh! Another way I use it is to add some pureed squash to macaroni and cheese. :) A great way to sneak in some veggies, and I think it actually makes it taste better! Since it’s orange, it blends right into the cheese.

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  94. Linda says

    I have been using butternut squash for pumpkin recipes for years. It is so much more flavorful than the big pumpkins. My latest and favorite recipe is roasted butternut squash:

    Peel, seed, and cube a large squash (about 8 C)
    Toss to coat well with:
    2 T olive oil
    1 t. ground cumin
    1 t. salt
    1/2 t. ground allspice
    1/2 t. ground coriander
    1/4 t. ground pepper
    Spread squash in a single layer on baking sheet(s) or pans and bake 40 min., 400′, turning 2-3 X
    Delicious

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  95. downhomemama says

    We’ve invested in this amazing juicer. I love it!
    My kids absolutely LOVE Apple/Carrot juice. It gives it a nice sweetness to it.

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  96. says

    The last commentator mentioned roasted butternut squash, and this is one of my favorites. However I do it a little differently. I like to cube up the squash along with potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, and quartered red onion. I toss them in olive oil, salt and pepper, (If you have fresh rosemary, use it too! And lots of it!), roast them in a casserole or cookie sheet at 400 or 425, turning frequently. Make this a complete dinner by using a large cast iron dutch oven (Bake at 375). Brown both sides of a whole chicken in butter, then add your vegetables, place your layer of onions on top (at least 2 large ones). The onions seep down over the vegetables and make them SO SWEET. Put your lid on and in about 1 hour and 30 minutes you have a steaming hot dinner ready to go. I also make Butternut squash soup very simply. Peel and cube raw squash, saute in butter with 1 onion. Add enough chicken broth or water to cover and let simmer until cooked. Add salt and pepper to taste. Use a hand blender to puree (I know you don’t want to buy one, or maybe you already have by now, but it’s so nice not to have to puree in a plastic food processor or blender and use a whole nother pot for your blended soup.) When your done simply ladel into bowls and serve with a dollop of sour cream, or drizzle heavy cream over the bowls. Yummy and pretty! I am sure enjoying your blog!

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    Sarah F Reply:

    I also make butternut squash soup. It’s pretty much the same but I add a cinnamon stick that has been heated with oil till fragrant. The topper of Cinnamon Crema is what makes this soup special though. 1 C Sour cream, 2 Tbsp Honey and 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon. I’ve made crema also with homemade yogurt

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  97. says

    We love the butternut squash soup with apple & croutons. We have this every Thanksgiving & it’s the best part of the meal, no kidding! I’m not going to wait to have it at Thanksgiving – I’ll make some very soon. It’s best eaten at room temp. not hot & not cold, just sort of warm. Really, so good.

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  98. Alice says

    We LOVE butternut squash ravioli at our house! It’s on the list of things to make next weekend… sooner if it’s a quiet week at work!

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    Sarah F Reply:

    This is my family’s favorite too! Sooo yummy with butter and sage.

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  99. Betsy M says

    Cubed and boiled squash makes for a much healthier side dish than mashed potatoes… or it’s AWESOME when you boil the butternut squash WITH the potatoes and mash it all together. By far, though, the very best is roasted alongside potatoes and/or other root veggies in the oven and served with a lovely roast — particularly with lamb. The key is a convection oven so it all crisps up perfectly! YUM!!!

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  100. says

    I just found your site tonight and love it enormously, in fact it looks like I love it more than my husband. He’s in the other room, and I’m here trying to read it all in one go!

    But I digress. Here in Australia we call Butternut Squash, Butternut Pumpkin. They are really one and the same, only the Butternut is a bit more moist than the usual pumpkin. Nothing a few mins more on the stove won’t fix.

    Did I mention that I love your site? Congratulations for having the ability to write without sounding like you spend all day finding the perfect words, and yet also keeping everything interesting enough to keep reading.

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  101. dottie says

    i just love your website. soooooo informative. can’t wait to try the recipies, and appreciate the tips.

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  102. Melanie says

    We love butternut squash, my kids eat it just like that before I can prepare anything, lol.
    Another idea is though to use the squash and make it into a pizza sauce instead of using tomato sauce. My son couldn’t tolerate tomatoes when he was younger so I used butternut squash to make the pizza sauce, just season as you would regular pizza sauce and add your favorite toppings.

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  103. Traci S. says

    Butternut squash is one of our favorites! I make soup w/ it all the time and everyone in our house loves it. Just roast the squash per instructions in original post. While the squash is roasting, mince 2 shallots and sautee in 3 T. of (real) butter in a deep sauce pan. Scoop roasted squash into pan w/ shallots. Add salt, pepper, 1/4 t. thyme and 1/8 t. cayenne pepper (+/- for your taste). Mash squash to combine w/ sauteed shallots and spices in sauce pan. Add 4-6 oz. light cream cheese and 14 oz. light chicken broth. Puree everything in a blender and return to sauce pan to heat through if it isn’t hot enough. This soup is smooth as velvet and great on its own or as a cup of soup w/ roasted pork loin (or chicken) and a green salad.

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  104. Rachel says

    I have a recipe for Butternut Squash soup that is AMAZING. I got it from Ruth Lawrence many years ago. Wes and I LOVE it. The boys, not so much. {sigh}

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    Laura Reply:

    Ooh, send me the recipe. If it was Ruth’s, I’d love to have it too. :)

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  105. Naomi says

    Yes, they are in the same family. I read once somewhere that companies who sell canned pumpkin often use butternut squash interchangeably with pumpkin. My grandmother used to prepare what she called fried pumpkin, as it was my grandfather’s favorite dish. It was simply cooked (probably on stovetop), mashed, and sauteed in some butter to become slightly browned.

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  106. Kelley says

    I have used regular old yellow squash to make a “coconut” pie :) You grate the squash and add coconut flavoring. No one ever knew that it was actually squash ;)

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