Fresh Peach Milkshakes

It’s story time, children. Please sit down, criss-cross-applesauce, and listen quietly.

Once upon a time, there was a lady who got a new blender. It wasn’t just any blender. It was the blender of all blenders, the Blend-Tec blender that she’d been waiting patiently to purchase.

She was super excited to make a peach milkshake with the fresh peaches she had in her kitchen, and figured that reading all the fine print in the “blender handbook” would be a waste of time. “How hard can it be?” she thought, “It’s just a blender.”

And so, the uninformed lady proceeded to fill the blender to the top with delicious whole milk, slices of fresh peach, maple syrup, and vanilla. With excitement, she placed the lid on the blender and pushed the on button.

Before the lady could say “one Mississippi” the force within the blender sent the lid shooting right off the top. With a shout that sounded something like, “Aaoourrhheeeewwryeeeoo!” the lady quickly smacked the off button. But no matter. Peach milkshake had been sent to the ceiling, to the floor, to the stack of mail beside the blender, to the casseroles sitting on the countertop, to the side of the refrigerator, to surfaces she found three days later, and I think it goes without saying, to the clothes, arms, legs, shoes, and hair of the befuddled lady.

She stood, quite shocked and motionless, for approximately 8 Mississippi’s, before calling in her 12 year old son. With a chuckle, said 12 year old brought in the camera, as moments such as this should be documented and preserved forever in ones memory and computer picture file.

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This picture does not do the situation justice.
“The lady” was covered, the rug was covered, everything was covered. 

Thus lunch-time was delayed, and the kitchen got a much needed scrubbing. The lady soon smelled sour from being drenched with dairy product, and even though she changed her clothes before going to a soccer game, was surprised to find flecks of dried peach stuck to her knees and ankles during half time.

The moral of the story: Read the directions, do not overfill your blender, and do not be surprised to find crusty milkshake residue four feet away on the front of the silverware drawer next Friday.

The end.

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Everybody hungry for a Peach Milkshake now? Below you’ll find a recipe, which only makes about 2 servings. Trying to make 6 servings at once, no matter how large your blender, is a bad, bad, bad idea. I’m still not quite over it.

Fresh Peach MilkshakesYum

2 cups whole milk
2 fresh peaches, sliced
1 Tablespoon real maple syrup
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

Place ingredients in a blender, making sure the blender is only half-full, trust me on this one. Place lid on the blender, plug it in, and give it a whirl until ingredients are well blended.

Fresh Peach Milkshake

Make this milkshake at your own risk.

What If I Can’t Buy Raw Milk?

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“Laura, what would you do if you couldn’t get raw milk for your family?”

It’s a question I receive often – from those who either don’t have a good source for raw milk in their area or because the cost involved would cause them to take out a second mortgage. 

Well, as of just a few weeks ago, our family is without our fresh, raw milk. So now I get to answer this question from first hand experience!

Why are we no longer getting grass fed, farm fresh, raw milk? (Oh, just typing all of that deliciousness makes me miss it!)  Thankfully, this is just a temporary change for us, as our milk supplier has dried up her cow for a few months. Come August, we’ll be getting the best of the best again. For just $5 a gallon. We are so spoiled!

In the meantime, I could call on other sources around here for raw milk. I decided not to do that for two reasons:  1) I felt it was rude of me to say, “Hi. I need some of your milk for three months, but then I’ll no longer need you again so really, it’s like I’m just using you right now.” and 2) I didn’t want to go to the trouble of figuring out all the details. 

Lazy? Sort of. Mostly I just needed one less thing to do. Or I didn’t need one more thing to do. Or something like that.

So what are we doing about milk during these three months?

We have chosen to buy whole, organic milk from the store. It is likely from cows which were not entirely grass fed. It is very pastuerized and homogenized. But at least it doesn’t have growth hormones or antibiotics. It’s not the best, but it is a better choice, so I’m okay with it. 

We’ve also chosen not to guzzle down three gallons of milk each week like we used to. We’ve used our one weekly gallon mainly for cooking.

I’ve taken a little break too from making yogurt, kefir, and buttermilk. I miss it! In the meantime, I’m getting organic whole milk yogurt from Azure Standard or Trader Joes when I have access. 

I also stocked up on organic coconut milk when it was on sale at Vitacost a few weeks ago. That is great for a healthy variety, plus it’s perfect for making smoothies!

Come August, we’ll be having a raw milk party at our house. I can’t wait! In the meantime, I feel at peace with our choice to buy organic milk from the store. 

What kind of milk works for your family? Raw milk, organic milk, regular milk, no milk, coconut milk, goat milk?  (Wow, look at all the choices!)

Homemade Pudding Pops

You know how all your friends growing up always had the cool snacks at their house? (Although I’m sure my friends thought I was the one with the cool snacks.)  One of my friends always had Jello Pudding Pops at her house. Visiting her in the summer was always a treat. Don’t worry – I liked her for more than just her pudding pops. I mean, she also had really cool Cabbage Patch Dolls. No really – I liked my friend for who she was – not just for her pudding pops and dolls (and cool play room and cute puppy).

I can not recreate a Cabbage Patch Doll, nor do I think my boys would want me to. But Beth at Turn 2 the Simple reminded me a few days ago with her comment on my Creamy Pudding recipe that I can recreate a Pudding Pop! I love how tasty these are, how refreshing they are on a hot day – and how they actually offer some nourishment and keep my kids full for a little while.

I simply followed my Creamy Pudding recipes and froze the mixture into pudding pops. EASY!!! I made both chocolate and vanilla. I didn’t try butterscotch, but I think I might next time just for fun!

How to Make Pudding Pops:

Make a batch (or two or three) of pudding. You can use my healthy varieties of Creamy Pudding if you want!

Pour the pudding into popsicle containers or 3 ounce sized bathroom cups.
Each batch of pudding made about 15 Pudding Pop cups.
I found it easiest to put all the cups on a large cookie sheet for easier transport the freezer.


Allow the pudding to cool and set up (about 45 minutes). Place a popsicle stick in each cup:


Put the Pudding Pops into the freezer for at least 4 hours. I was surprised that it took quite a while for these to be frozen through and through. Oh, but when they were frozen – it took me back to my days as a little girl playing with Cabbage Patch Dolls with my friend, and eating pudding pops on her porch.


Do you have any Pudding Pop or Cabbage Patch Doll memories to share? Oh dear, or are some of you too young to remember Cabbage Patch Dolls?

Healthy Treat for Today: Creamy Pudding

Today, I am sharing recipes for three varieties of YUMMY Creamy Pudding! Just look at all these wholesome ingredients!

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And…if you put all or some of those wonderful ingredients together…you’ll get these:
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Aaaand…if you put all those three together…and put real whipped cream on top…you’ll get this:
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Creamy Vanilla PuddingYum

2 1/2 cups milk
3 egg yolks
1/2 cup real maple syrup (grade B is best for you) or honey
4 Tablespoons arrowroot powder (or organic corn starch)
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
1 Tablespoon butter
1 teaspoon vanilla

In a medium saucepan, whisk together milk, egg yolks, maple syrup, arrowroot powder and salt. Cook over medium heat, stirring CONSTANTLY until pudding begins to thicken. Stir over the heat for about 15 more seconds. Remove immediately from the heat, and continue to stir until pudding is creamy. (I use my whisk the whole time for stirring and find this works great!)  Add butter and vanilla and continue to stir until mixed. Pour into serving dishes and serve warm, or chill for two hours and serve cold.

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Butterscotch Creamy Pudding

2 1/2 cups milk
3 egg yolks
2/3 cup sucanat (dehydrated cane sugar juice…has a wonderful “molassasy” taste!)
4 Tablespoons arrowroot powder (or organic corn starch)
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
3 Tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon vanilla

In a medium saucepan, whisk together milk, egg yolks, sucanat, arrowroot powder and salt. Cook over medium heat, stirring CONSTANTLY until pudding begins to thicken. Remove immediately from the heat, and continue to stir until pudding is creamy. Add butter and vanilla and continue to stir until mixed. Pour into serving dishes and serve warm, or chill for two hours and serve cold.

Chocolate Creamy Pudding

2 1/2 cups milk
3 egg yolks
2/3 cup sucanat or 1/2 cup real maple syrup
1/4 cup cocoa powder
4 Tablespoons arrowroot powder (or organic corn starch)
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
3 Tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon vanilla

In a medium saucepan, whisk together milk, egg yolks, sucanat or maple syrup, cocoa, arrowroot powder and salt. Cook over medium heat, stirring CONSTANTLY until pudding begins to thicken. Remove immediately from the heat, and continue to stir until pudding is creamy.   Add butter and vanilla and continue to stir until mixed. Pour into serving dishes and serve warm, or chill for two hours and serve cold.

Oh, and just a couple of tips to make SURE your pudding is super good:

1. Enlist the help of an blond headed eight year old (or a close equivilent).

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2. Be sure to have a short, cute taste tester on hand for quality control purposes. (I have some taller taste testers around here somewhere…guess they didn’t smell the “purding” cooking like the little guy did.)

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