Honey Whole Wheat Bagels

honey_whole_wheat_bagels

I used to make these bagels all the time…then I guess I forgot about them.  Recently the boys asked, “WHEN are you going to make those yummy bagels again?!”  (I think they ended the sentence with “oh our Beautiful Mother Dearest” or something like that.)

Funny how you can completely forget about a particular recipe for a while.  I made the requested bagels again last weekend and I think I made quite a few little men (and one tall one) very happy.  Wow, is that all it takes?

Making bagels takes a few different steps…but they aren’t hard steps.  You mix, rest, shape, broil, boil, and bake.  I kinda think it’s fun to say “broil your bagels”, but then again, I don’t get out much.

Honey Whole Wheat Bagels

4  to 4 1/2  cups whole wheat flour (I use freshly ground flour from hard white wheat)
1 pkg yeast (2 1/4 teaspoons)
1 1/2 cups warm water (if you put your finger in and it hurts, it’s too hot and will kill your yeast)
3 Tablespoons honey + 1 Tablespoon honey
1 teaspoon sea salt

Stir together 2 cups of the flour, the salt and the yeast.  Add in the warm water and 3 Tablespoons honey.  Gradually add in the remaining flour.

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Dump it out and knead the flour in until the dough is smooth and elastic.
Cover the dough and let it take a nap for about 10 minutes.  (zzzz)

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Divide the dough into twelve equal parts.

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Set a timer for 20 minutes.  Begin shaping each piece of dough into a nice ball.  Stick your finger in the middle of the ball and pull it apart to create about a 2 inch hole.

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Lay it onto a buttered cookie sheet or baking stone.
Continue until all the bagels are formed.  Let them sit until your timer goes off.

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After your 20 minute timer goes off, turn the broiler on in your oven.
Broil your bagels for 2 minutes on each side.

Meanwhile…bring a big pot of water to a boil.  Stir in the remaining 1 T. honey.

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Put 4-6 bagels into the water, turn down the heat and
simmer for seven minutes, turning the bagels over once during that time.

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Continue to boil your bagels until they are all done.
Let them drain on a towel for 1-2 minutes.

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Bake at 375 ° for 25-30 minutes or until the tops are golden brown.

Slice these, toast them, then slather them with butter or cream cheese for breakfast….oh my goodness.

Now I want to experiment with cinnamon raisin or blueberry bagels…and what other flavors can you think of?

Okay, answer me this….is it fun to say “broil your bagels” or is it just me?  Yeah, you know you love it.
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This post is linked to Frugal Fridays.

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Comments

  1. Tuesday says

    Well, ‘broil your bagles’ made me giggle, too, but I don’t get out much either :D

    I’ve tried a lot of bagle recipes, but they never come out right. This one has promise! And who doesn’t like whole wheat? Thanks for posting!

    [Reply]

  2. Michelle says

    I found you thru Halle The Homemaker. I think “broil your bagels” sounds funny as well. I am looking forward to trying this recipe. My children love bagels (who doesn’t right?) Thanks for sharing the recipe.

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  3. Jenny says

    I just made these bagels and they are fantastic. Mine aren’t as pretty as yours, but they taste great! Now, if I only eat one (and not the whole batch). :) I have thought about make bagels for a long time, but hesitated because it sounded like it took a long time, but it doesn’t. These are absolutely great!

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  4. says

    My sister and I made these bagels… which are amazing… but we made chocolate chip, blueberry, garlic & sunflower seed versions… you should most certainly experiment… they were so good!

    [Reply]

  5. lorena says

    hi..thanks for sharing..!!
    I was wondering what kind of flour did you use?
    I just don’t get it..thanks

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I used freshly ground whole wheat flour.

    [Reply]

  6. says

    These have really good flavor. I just finished making a batch (I actually still have a pan baking right now), and they turned out well. I did have a problem with several of them … they shrunk and are wrinkled. Any ideas on how to fix that? I wondered if it might be because they sat for awhile between the time that I broiled them and boiled them? I’ve never broiled them before, and have had the shrinking and wrinkling problem on a much larger scale. I’m guessing that broiling helps to reduce that … any advice would be welcome!
    Thanks for sharing – I’ve been looking for a good bagel recipe. I have 6 younger siblings, and we all like bagels! BTW, I had my 11 year old sister say “broil your bagels” 3 times real fast, and she came out with “bury your bagels” :) :)

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Mine get wrinkled sometimes too, but yes, the broiling helps prevent that.

    [Reply]

  7. Pat London says

    I was looking for an easy recipe for bagels and this is truely it!!!! I modified the recipe by adding a half cup of King Arthus Harvest Grain blend for more nutreitns and fiber. Also, for six of the bagels I added cinnamon and raisins. Yum, my family enjoyed these. I’m ready to start another batch. Thanks for the recipe.

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  8. RG says

    Nice. I’ll try this soon. I am one who has to borrow brains. Would you say white wheat berries would work, or red? If you put fruit in them or onion, how much would you do, like a half of a cup? Thanks.

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I like white wheat berries best and think red would make this recipe too heavy. Yes, I think a half a cup of add in would be perfect!

    [Reply]

  9. Naomi says

    This looks soo good!! Am gonna try it this afternoon…we like the cinn. an raisin, would you just add it to the batter??

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Yes, just knead it in at the end!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I mean at the end of adding in the rest of the ingredients! :)

    [Reply]

  10. Kelli says

    Okay, newbie bread/bagel maker here . . . how long do you knead for? I’m not exactly sure how to tell when it is elasticy or smooth enough . . . Thanks :)

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Probably for about 8 minutes or so?

    [Reply]

  11. Ruby says

    So I was over-zealous & tried both the Whole Wheat Bread & the Honey Whole Wheat Bagels…at the same time. I’m going to try baking them at the same time as well. Have you ever done that successfully?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    No, I’ve not done it before. How did it work?

    [Reply]

    Ruby Reply:

    Baking them at the same time seemed to work just fine…the bread turned out wonderfully! (The bagels, as I already shared, were shriveled after I boiled them. That didn’t stop the family from eating them, though!)

    [Reply]

  12. Ruby says

    I just baked my bagels, but most of them turned out a bit shriveled. I read elsewhere online that the shriveling is due to over-rising the dough before boiling them, or letting them rise in a room that’s too hot. Just thought I’d share that in case it might help someone else. Can’t wait to try these!

    [Reply]

  13. michele says

    I made these today and first off was the dough supposed to rise after 10 minutes b/c it looked exactly the same. Also, they are very dense. What did I do wrong? Are they supposed to come out dense.

    Thanks

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Hmm, I’m not sure. Your yeast may not have worked because mine always start puffing up right away after I shape them. Since they didn’t rise, that would make them very dense. They are going to be a little bit dense because bagels sort of are…but it just sounds like your yeast didn’t activate well. :(

    [Reply]

  14. J says

    Care to share the recipe for Cinnamon raisin and blueberry?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Sure, if I ever get around to actually MAKING them!! :)

    [Reply]

  15. says

    Oh, I am SO looking forward to making these. My husband eats bagel sandwiches at work every day, at I hate to paying $3 per pack for the ones he likes best. I’ve looked on other sites, but it seemed to be a long and expensive endeavor, so I’m thrilled to have found your recipe. By the way…my whole wheat crackers are crisping up as we speak. Can’t wait!

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  16. J says

    I’m SO frustrated that I found this recipe. I made them with chocolate chips and now I can’t stop eating them! Especially covered with a layer of cream cheese. I must resist eating a 3rd!

    [Reply]

  17. Kristin W says

    Hi! I love this site – such a great resource for eating well! Your honey whole wheat has become our staple bread (that is, until I try the sourdough – who knows how much we’ll love that?!) I have a question about these bagels. Do you freeze them? What point in the making, cooking process would it be good to freeze them? I’d like to freeze them after the broiling and boiling, so all I had to do was bake when I got them out, but I’m not sure if that would work. Did anything specific work for you?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I haven’t frozen these before, so I’m really not sure how it would work. MAYBE you could freeze them after they’ve been boiled, but I’m just not sure. I think they’d work best to be baked, then frozen, thawed then toasted.

    [Reply]

    Kristin W Reply:

    Just FYI – I froze these bagels after boiling, let them thaw on the counter for an hour or so, and then baked the, for the normal amount of time and they came out really good! They looked slightly different – perhaps not as shiny and had a few more wrinkles – but the taste and texture was not compromised. I’ve got some stashed in the freezer for breakfasts this month!

    [Reply]

  18. Anna Knight says

    Is there any way that you can figure out how to make french onion? Those bagles are sooo tasty, and I want to make them, but I can’t figure out how to make them with out using that pre=made french onion soup mix that is really unhealthy and full of nasty stuff. You know the mix that I’m talking about, right?

    [Reply]

    Anna Knight Reply:

    Also… I used real maple syrup instead of honey, and made maple syrup whole wheat bagles and they were soo tasty!

    [Reply]

    reboloke Reply:

    I’ve never made these or any other bagels, but french onion soup is basically caramelized onion in a rich beef broth, so if you want french onion bagels I would try adding some cooked onion and substituting beef broth for the water.

    I may have to try making these this snowy afternoon… I love bagels and have been kind of hungry for some.

    [Reply]

  19. Samantha says

    Oh Horray!! A recipe that I will use on a weekly basis due to E’s obsession with sausage cheese bagels before work! Thank you thank you thank you!

    And yes “broil your bagel” does sound… funny!

    [Reply]

  20. says

    Have you tried this with soaking? How would you do that? Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I have yet to try this with soaking…if I ever figure it out, I’ll be sure to post about it!

    [Reply]

    Sara B Reply:

    Could you mix up everything except the yeast and a little of the water and honey, and then add that in the morning? And use buttermilk instead of water for soaking?

    [Reply]

    Sara B Reply:

    if you say it MIGHT work, I will try it! And let you know :)

  21. Amy says

    Oooooh….I just HAD to send you the link to a recipe I found for pumpkin bagels!! I haven’t tried it yet, but I’m definitely going to!! I’m thinking that might be a nice little Christmas goody…half a dozen pumpkin spice bagels in a pretty bag w/ some cream cheese and a cute little knife??? Anyhoo….I’m sure you could healthify this one a bit. Maybe switch the brown sugar for sucanat??

    http://fromapples2zucchini.blogspot.com/2010/09/pumpkin-spice-bagels.html

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    YUM!

    [Reply]

  22. says

    Made bagels this morning & they were great! (I added about a tsp. of cinnamon to the dough…can hardly taste it but yum!).
    I didn’t broil mine first though and only boiled for 3 minutes. I also brushed the tops with one beaten egg and baked at 400 for 20 minutes. It worked well.

    The only problem is–there were only 8 :)

    [Reply]

  23. Sarag says

    Hi, I have a question. I’m going to try making your bagels tomorrow. You say to boil them for seven minutes, and then you say to “continue boiling until they are done”. About how long would this be? I have no idea what I’m doing, so can you give me a general timeframe of how long they have to boiled after the initial seven minutes? Thanks :)

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Ah, I see why that was confusing. I just meant…you can only boil a few of your bagels at one time. Boil the first few for 7 minutes, set them on a cloth to drain, then boil THE REST of them for seven minutes. I meant for you to boil bagels until you have them ALL boiled for seven minutes each.

    Does that make more sense?

    [Reply]

  24. Nancy says

    What temperature do use to broil them?

    Nancy

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Hmm, my oven just has a “Hi Broil” and a “Lo Broil”. I broil mine on “Hi” but I don’t know what exact temp that is.

    [Reply]

  25. Nancy says

    What temperature do you use to broil the bagels?

    [Reply]

    RandiLynn Reply:

    Most broil temperatures are 500 degrees.

    [Reply]

  26. Lynn Allen says

    I always follow directions to a “T” when i am new to something. You said, “set the timer for 20 minutes and begin shaping bagels and laying them on a buttered pan. when the timer goes off, broil them”

    Is this the step that was supposed to raise the bagels? I did this exactly and they did not raise, so I thought boiling may raise them. It didn’t. So I thought maybe baking would raise them. It didn’t.

    I feel a complete failure. Could you insert after the “set the timer for 20 minutes” advice that the bagels should rise? That way, newbie newbie bagel cooks like me could know to keep them longer so they rise if still skinny at 20 minutes.

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    You followed the directions perfectly!! They really aren’t supposed to rise much…just a tiny bit during that 20 minute time. Bagels are a little more dense than a regular bread, which is why they don’t need much rise time.

    [Reply]

  27. says

    I’m currently making these and they don’t seem to be rising like your’s did! :_( I guess I should wait until the end to get upset.

    Loved the maple syrup idea. I’m using buckwheat honey (which has an AMAZING flavor on its own…)

    YUM!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Bummer that they didn’t rise properly. Hopefully they tasted okay?? :)

    [Reply]

  28. Elizabeth says

    Wonderful recipe! I added raisins and cinnamon to the dough.. MMMMMMM! Thanks for the recipe and the website!

    [Reply]

  29. Jamie B says

    I already have some whole wheat molasses oatmeal bread rising, but making some bagels sounds like the perfect snow day activity. I’ll be trying these once the kiddo is down for a nap :D

    [Reply]

  30. Beth Visser says

    Any idea how to make an asiago cheese bagel – like they have at Panara Bread? I wasn’t sure at what point to put the cheese on top…

    I made your honey whole wheat bread last night – fantastic. Hoping to make the bagels today.

    [Reply]

  31. Brandi says

    Omg I so am going to try this soon cause my son and i are HUGE bagel fans. Normally blue berry bagels. All i do is add blueberry’s right? Oh my i cant wait to try…U dont have a home made cream cheese do u? Thanks laura. Just found this site to night been looking up recipe’s for like 3 hours..

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Yes, just add blueberries. And you can use store bought cream cheese if you want!

    [Reply]

  32. says

    Hi, Laura! ;o)

    I’m still learning about the soaking thing
    (to break down phytates) & wondered if you
    soak this recipe beforehand? Also, what’s
    your basic premise on what you do or do not
    soak? Hmmmmm

    I was also a little confused b/c I am borrowing
    the “Nourshing Traditions” book & it talks
    about doing the soaking in a “warm” place
    overnight. Is this really necessary?
    My oven doesn’t have any light, so I don’t
    know where else I could put my ingre. in to
    soak that would keep them “warm”. Thanks
    for getting back with me on this as I’m still
    trying to learn & grasp these new concepts!
    As always, your patience is much appreciated!!
    I’m still loving your recipes……soo good!!!
    Blessings!
    Amy

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I haven’t tried soaking these. There are some recipes I just haven’t taken the time to figure out and I haven’t worried about it too much since we’re eating healthy, whole grains.

    Eh, warm place or not…I’ve never really given it much thought. I think wherever you leave it overnight will be fine. I think NT just means – not in the fridge. I think. :)

    [Reply]

  33. says

    I made bagels today, and they wre great! I had tried bagels once as a teenager for a 4-h project. Major flop. I just crossed that off my list of possibilities. I am so glad I gave this recipe a try, very good! My only regret is I don’t have any cream cheese!

    [Reply]

  34. says

    I would love to make these, but we are having to make everything with sourdough, because of yeast overgrowth issues and lyme disease. Do you know of a good bagel recipe with sourdough?? Or is it pretty easy to change over the recipe for sourdough use?? THanks!!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I don’t know of one right now, but if I can figure one out someday, I’ll be sure to share!

    [Reply]

  35. Marisa says

    I live in a high-altitude place. Do you know if I will need to reduce the yeast in these bagels for them to turn out right? When making bread, I usually reduce the yeast by at least 1/2 tsp. (or when baking, reduce by about half of the total amount of leavening agent). Thanks!

    Alternately… I can try it and let you know! :)

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Yikes, I’m not up on how to tweak recipes for high altitude. I’d say try it the way you tweak your bread and see what happens. Then be sure to let us know!

    [Reply]

    Marisa Reply:

    Hi Laura,
    I tried making these bagels today (finally!) using the recipe’s stated
    amount of yeast, and they turned out perfectly! (I let them rise in a
    200-degree oven once shaped into O’s, since my kitchen was a bit
    chilly this morning). My husband was quite impressed. :) I will definitely be
    making these again, and would love to try some other variations!

    [Reply]

  36. Betsy says

    I was wondering what kind of yeast you used–active dry or instant. Maybe that’s why some people had trouble with the rising. I’m going to make these today and use the instant.

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I believe mine is active dry. I threw away the package though so I’m really not sure!

    [Reply]

  37. Ginny says

    Thanks so much for sharing this recipe. I made everything whole wheat bagels last night and they turned out well!

    [Reply]

  38. Jennifer says

    I tried this recipe today and it didn’t work at all:-( I fresh ground whole white wheat berries- but my grinder doesn’t get the flour powder fine- it was a little coarse- am wondering if that had anything to do with it? Also I used dry active yeast, and in all other recipes, have combined it with the water and let it sit first- i just added the yeast right to the dry ingredients like you did here- and I don’t think it activated at all- my bread didn’t rise at ALL- stayed a hard little lump. Should I leave it sit longer- other recipes say to let the dough sit overnight- have you done that? The flavor/smell is good- but the finished bagels are rock-hard dense:-(

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Yes, it could be that the flour was too course. I also use dry active yeast, so I wouldn’t imagine that was the problem. I’ve never let mine sit all night. So sorry they didn’t work for you!

    [Reply]

  39. Sue says

    My two girls and two girl frineds wanted to make bread and we only had whole wheat flour. We found your recipe and are enjoying the finished product. Yum!!!! They are so happy with their accomplishments that they are joking about dropping out of college and making and selling bagels for a living. Thank you for your recipe! You made a spring break day at home in the rain special.

    [Reply]

  40. says

    We made these today. They’re so good! I did find that the broiling was a bit too long. It almost cooked them through so I found that I didn’t need to bake for as long later. Thanks for the wonderful recipe!

    [Reply]

  41. Mahmooda says

    Oh my Godness, these bagels were so yummy. My boys loved them. Thank you so much Laura for this recipes and this wonderful website. I just wanted to request one thing: would you be able to update the time on draining the bagels? I let them drain for 5-10 minutes before baking. And, they came out really good. I am not sure if that is what you did.

    Thank you again and God bless.

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Hmm, I just drained them long enough to get them all out of the water…then baked them right away. Looks like I didn’t specify a draining time huh? Thanks for pointing that out!

    [Reply]

  42. Soccy says

    I will be making these tomorrow for sure. I have a questions though: do bagels really need to have that hole in the middle? Also, how long would I knead in my Bosch? Thanks. This recipe seems nice and easy and not so scary.

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Bagels really do work better with the hole in the middle. I’m sorry I don’t have a Bosch, so I’m not sure on how long to knead it in that. I’m clueless about Boschs, but I’ve heard they are wonderful!

    [Reply]

  43. says

    Can you make these into mini bagels? You know like instead of 12 divide them again for 24?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I would imagine so, but I’ve never tried it. Sounds like fun!

    [Reply]

  44. Melissa says

    I am planning on making these for a brunch this weekend, but I live in extreme humidity. Do you have any pieces of advice for me? Generally I add a little extra flour to baking recipes to combat this but half the time things don’t turn out right and I’m not completely sure why, haha.

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I’m really not sure what to recommend, yes maybe a little extra flour, although too much would make a dry dough.

    [Reply]

  45. says

    I am so thankful for your great tutorial! I have been wanting to make bagels for a long time, but I was scared being of the boiling part. But it was so easy and I will be tasting my bagels in a few minutes. I used Kamute instead of whole wheat flour because its gluten free, so we will see how that tastes!

    God bless!
    Rebecca

    [Reply]

  46. says

    I made them and my family ate them real quick! we loved them! thank you so much for a great recipe!!! We ate them in 2 days! :)There are only 4 of us. hahaha :)

    [Reply]

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