Grain Mills Pt. 3: What Grains to Use and Where to Find Them

In this little Grain Mill Series, we’ve talked about whether or not you should buy a grain mill…and if so…which one should you get and where should you get it? Now we’ll talk about which grains to use and where you can find them!

Which Grain to Use:

  • I try to find organic or chemical free grain.
  • My very favorite grain to use is Hard White Organic Wheat. I like it much better than Hard Red Wheat. It has the same nutritional value, but when you use hard white wheat, it hardly seems like you’re eating whole wheat at all! Hard red wheat seems to make my recipes a bit heavier.
  • You can use Soft White Wheat to make pastry flour (for use in cookies and muffins) and Hard White Wheat for yeast breads. BUT I just use my hard white wheat for everything. It’s just simpler…I only have to have one kind of wheat on hand…and it just tastes good.
  • I also love kamut and spelt…but don’t use them as much, usually because they cost a bit more.
  • I grind my own corn into corn meal. This makes the BEST cornbread and cornbread muffins. I love freshly ground corn!
  • You can grind rice and make rice flour if you like. It is actually recommended that you grind a cup or so of rice every few months through your mill just to clean it out! (I’ve GOT to remember to do that!)

Where to Find Good Quality Grains:

  • First check around locally. Check out Local Harvest to find out if there is a good source of grains near you.
  • I almost always order my wheat, corn and rice from Azure Standard. If you live in an area where there is an Azure Standard co-op delivery, I highly recommend purchasing this high quality grain from them. You can still order independently from Azure Standard, but shipping may be high.
  • Tropical Traditions has several varieties of very high quality grains. Watch for “free shipping” days and take advantage!
  • Paula’s Bread sells a few different varieties of grain on her site. She’ll ship it to you, or you can go pick it up if you live near her in Oklahoma.
  • Pleasant Hill Grain happens to be right up the road from me!! I was excited to see the shipping is FREE on orders over $99!!!!
  • Wheat Montana has great prices on wonderful wheat (I used to be able to get their wheat from Wal-mart for a great price). Shipping from their site is pretty pricey.
  • Healthy Food Mall is worth checking into. Their costs are higher for the grain, but shipping seemed more reasonable.
  • Don’t forget Amazon. I’ve never bought grain from them because shipping is high, but I keep checking there to see if there’s a reasonable option.

Grain will last for a long time. If you come upon a good resource for wheat, I say buy a LOT. It will store safely for years without going bad!

Okay everyone with a grain mill!! Share where buy your grain and where you live so that others in your area can learn from you!
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This post is linked to Frugal Fridays.

Comments

  1. melanie says

    Central Iowa:
    I shop in Dallas Center (near DesMoines) for wheat berries at The Baker’s Pantry – used to be Keller’s Kountry Store. The new store downtown is lovely =) It’s similar to an Amish/Mennonite bulk-foods store, so lots of items beyond wheat berries.
    I think I paid $29.50 for 50# last month (I think that is discounted slightly b/c I buy several bags)
    I don’t think I can find a phone number very easily/quickly – not sure where I wrote it down last month ;-) (sorry!)

    *Yum* for white wheat! I too use it in almost everything! (toll house cookies, gravy, pie crust…)
    I’m sort of a snob when it comes to whole wheat ;-)

    [Reply]

  2. Amanda says

    In the Atlanta area, Bread Beckers is a great place to get wheat – very reasonably priced – they have a warehouse in Woodstock. They sell everything you need to mill wheat and make healthy recipes. They also have co-ops throughout the southeast, so you can check their website to see if you have a co-op in your area. Their website is http://www.breadbeckers.com, they are a family run business.

    [Reply]

    shannon Reply:

    Does Bread Beckers sell wheat berries? I have looked online and not seen it so have wondered. Thanks

    [Reply]

    soonermomof7 Reply:

    Yes, Shannon, the Bread Beckers sell wheat berries. You can buy hard
    white, hard red, and soft white varieties in several container sizes. Enjoy!

    [Reply]

    Jenjer Reply:

    Just an update – Bread Beckers in Acworth, Ga has increased their prices enormously. I’m checking for other places in the Atlanta area for bulk grains. I have read that feed stores are a good option. There is a Seventh Day Adventist store in Collegedale, Tn.( near Chattanooga) that we shopped at when we lived nearby. They are vegetarians and had great prices on bulk grains, beans and meat substitutes. We’ve not been there in a few years, and the last time we were there, they’re prices had gone up a lot, too. Don’t know if it’s fear of current world tensions, or it’s trendy to eat healthy, but prices have skyrocketed recently for these items.

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  3. says

    I order from Azure Standard, but do it through my local health food store. There is only one drop-off for the coop locally, but for me, not so local. My health food store also gives me a discount and my order gets shipped to them with their order! I used to buy dried corn for grinding into cornmeal, but now I purchase large bags of organic popcorn…makes a beautiful cornbread and it’s much cheaper!

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  4. says

    I the past I’ve bought grain from Paul’s grains. I don’t know about their prices in comparison with other places, but the grain was good quality and their customer service is great. My next grain order will be with Something Better. A friend will be arranging a group order so they will deliver in our area – Central NC. They have good prices on dry beans and Kamut, but Wheat Montana has better prices on the other wheat types.

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  5. Janet says

    In south central Pennsylvania, I go to Miller’s natural Foods in Bird-in-Hand, PA. They are amish, and have amazing prices on organic/ non organic beans, rice, wheat, spelt, etc. It’s about an hour from where I live, so I stock up every two or three months. I also get amazing deals on honey, maple syrup, and natural peanut butter!

    I also use only hard white wheat for everything. One time I accidentally bought a 50 bag of soft wheat, and it just isn’t the same! Too fluffy, or something. I DO like to use spelt, too, especially to make pancakes!

    [Reply]

    Melissa Reply:

    I was wondering if there was a place near me to get wheat (well it is 2 hours, but I have family out there). I assumed there had to be some in Lancaster somewhere. Thanks for the heads up!

    [Reply]

    Danielle Reply:

    Woohoo! thanks, I’m in South Central PA myself. Miller’s sounds familiar. I’ll check into them, thanks!

    [Reply]

    Allison Reply:

    http://www.dutchvalleyfoods.com/
    This bulk distributer is located in Myerstown PA. I’m close enough to pick up, and have purchased many items from them. If you’re not a retailer you need to call and ask for a guest password to view pricing.

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  6. Bessers says

    I order from a local Amish bulk food store. I think I paid around a dollar a pound for a fifty pound bag. I wish we had the lower costs here, but I guess that comes from not living near wheat farms!

    [Reply]

  7. says

    Those closest to us (of which I am aware) are:

    Heartland Harvest Farm, Mt. Solon, Va. – $20 for 50 pounds of hard red wheat…I use this for everything because it is the least expensive, local, and chemical-free grain available to me. It comes from a Mennonite family. (They also sell various pasture-fed meats which are so scrumptious that I really wonder what the stuff is that the try to pass of as meat down at the grocery store…these cost considerably more than what is at the store, but taste so much better that our family has simply reduced our consumption to allow us to buy the good stuff ;)

    http://www.heartlandharvestfarm.com/grains.html

    Otherwise I have access to Wheat Montana’s Prairie Gold varieties at two locations, usually comparable in price:

    Sharp Shopper – Harrisonburg, Va
    http://www.sharpshopper.net/

    and

    Dayton Farmer’s Market (only open Thur, Fri, Sat) – Dayton, Va
    http://www.daytonfarmersmarket.com/

    Hope this helps!

    [Reply]

  8. says

    Ok, I’ll admit it… I’m completely ignorant when it comes to wheat. :)

    I read about people buying wheat berries… Is there a difference between wheat berries and the grain or are they one in the same?

    See… told ya I don’t know a thing! :) Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Yes, wheat berries are the same thing as the actual grain. I was super confused too the first time I heard them called “berries”! :)

    [Reply]

    Becky@BoysRuleMyLife Reply:

    THANK YOU!!!! :)

    [Reply]

    melanie Reply:

    My parents have friends here from Australia. They came out one day to see my grain mill and big mixer in action. Even her DH was very interested – and told me they grow hard white wheat there =) BUT they do not call them ‘berries’ either.

    [Reply]

  9. says

    I’m in SC near the NC border. I just recently placed an order for wheat from a lady that runs a small store in Columbia. This is my first time ordering and I haven’t gotten my order yet, so I can’t really vouch for her yet but a friend highly recommended her. She gets orders from Wheat Montana and sells them pretty much at cost, I believe. 50# of Hard White Wheat is about $38. I paid more than that for half that amount in a special order from my local health food store! I’m excited to get my wheat as so far I’ve been buying small amounts in bulk from the local store until I get my order in. I’d love to find a source that’s closer but so far, this is the best. It’s a little over an hour’s drive and if I buy a large amount at a time, I won’t have to go too frequently.

    [Reply]

    Melanie Reply:

    i know it’s been a while, but is this place in SC a good one? Do you know if it is still open? Thank you!

    [Reply]

  10. Amie says

    Before I went gluten-free I shopped for wheat in my parents’ food storage. (I had their grain mill too!) Then they would replace it at their next trip to wherever it was they bought it. They have tons of food storage so this helped them rotate it. Also I would make 4 loaves of bread at a time and give one back to them. :)

    Oh how I miss grinding my own wheat and baking with it instantly!

    [Reply]

  11. Sherry says

    My husband just ordered me a nurtimill yesterday for my birthday from Paula’s bread. I am so excited. We live in Sitka, Alaska (which is an island) so we order a lot from Azure Standard and it is sent up here by barge from Seattle, Washington. I will be placing an order soon to get some hard white wheat. I made my first loaf of homemade bread two days ago and my husband and two children (2 1/2 and 18 months old) loved it. I can’t wait to try it with fresh ground flour! Thank you so much for your wonderful encouraging site. I love it.

    [Reply]

  12. Rebekah says

    I live in the south east and I buy my wheat from United Natural Foods. You have to form a co-op but that’s pretty much the only way to get wheat at a decent price. I just checked on Wheat Montana and it was 98 dollars to ship 2 50 pound bags of wheat. That’s crazy.

    [Reply]

    Suzanne Tomb Reply:

    Good to know – I am really wanting a mill (just reviewed Christmas budget and does not look like it will fit – Hmmm- how else to get it?!). I belong to a local coop that uses United and I was not sure they had the wheat – that is great that they do!

    [Reply]

    Becky@BoysRuleMyLife Reply:

    I use United National, too… just haven’t bought wheat from them (yet).

    I just looked up their prices: $23.60 for 25# organic, hard white. In case anyone was interested. :)

    [Reply]

  13. soonermomof7 says

    Thanks to all of you for your postings so far. I’ve learned about some new sources of great products from you!

    Coops are the way to go. Start one with your friends or fellow church members. It’s a great way to help each other.

    I have purchased most of my grains, honey, etc. from the Bread Beckers for over 10 years. Great people and excellent quality food items. They are expanding their business and will soon have web seminars (among other things) from which anyone can benefit.

    In the Atlanta area, the Natural Food Warehouse is a wonderful place to find all sorts of great food items at good prices without having to form a Coop.

    Encourage your friends toward better health!

    [Reply]

  14. says

    I live in central WI and oddly enough buy mine from the local hardware store, they have an amazing kitchen center. It is also available from several Amish or bulk stores around as well. I have also ordered from Country Life Foods, the deliver to the WI, MI, MN, MO, AR, OK and IL areas with a #50 bag of prairie gold white at $28 and organic hard white #50 for $42 I think.
    http://www.clnf.org

    [Reply]

  15. Rebecca says

    I just wanted to say “Thank you Laura!” and all you ladies for the great information. This is so timely for our family, as I plan on using my birthday money to buy a Nutrimill! I’m soooo excited! The Lord provides!!!!

    [Reply]

  16. Christina says

    I am lucky enough to be in Oklahoma, and grain is grown here. I order from oklahomafood.coop Hard red is between $8-$13 for 25 pounds. The price depends on how you want it packaged and who you order it from. Hard white doesn’t grow as well here, so it starts at $17 for 25 pounds. The food coop is great, as long as you remember to get your order in at the first of the month.

    [Reply]

  17. Alison says

    I just joined a co op this year that orders once a year from Wheat Montana. The prices were great and the wheat is delicious!

    [Reply]

  18. Kori says

    I have ordered my grains from Pleasant Hill Grain and been very happy with their service and quality. It comes in sturdy 6 gallon buckets (ranging between 45 and 50 pounds depending on the type of grain). I also order their special lids that are amazing! Their bulk grain prices already have shipping figured in and compared to other sites that have cheaper grain prices, they all end up more expensive once shipping is added.
    Locally I can drive an hour to Whole Foods and buy lots of grains also. If you get it in the bulk bag you get a 10% for their listed price (for the scoop it into a bag and buy price). This ends up a little cheaper than ordering from Pleasant Hill Grains. But I am buying a few kinds first from Pleasant Hill and once I have some buckets and lids, then I will just refill at Whole Foods when possible! I am getting different colors of lids for different kinds of grain! I have yellow for shoft white wheat, orange for rye, blue for spelt. My prairie gold and hard red I didn’t get lids for yet. :-)

    [Reply]

  19. Lisa says

    I buy my wheat from bread beckers.. I have a ?, I can only make bread in my Zojiroshi bread machine using hard red wheat. The hard and soft white does not come out. Does any one else have this problem or do you use a different recipe with different grains? I have hard, soft white and hard red.. Thanks

    [Reply]

    Charity Reply:

    I don’t know anything about the hard white, I have been using hard red. However, I learned from Breadbeckers that soft
    white is not good for yeast recipes. It does not have enough gluten to rise.

    [Reply]

    shannon Reply:

    Does bread beckers sell wheat berries. And with wheat berries do you have to worry about bugs and other things.

    [Reply]

    soonermomof7 Reply:

    Yes on the wheat berries (listed under grain/wheat) from the Bread Beckers. You can buy in large buckets and you will not have to worry about bugs/pests. Get a Gamma Seal lid for it and a lid lifter for opening the bucket initially. No worries.

    [Reply]

    soonermomof7 Reply:

    Hard white should work just fine. I’ve had no problems with it. I know a lot of people who combine half white and half red for a delicious bread.

    As was mentioned already, only use the soft white for non-yeast recipes like pancakes, waffles, quick breads, biscuits, muffins, gravy, etc.

    [Reply]

  20. says

    I just got a Nutrimill yesterday from paula’s bread. Does any one have any resources for wheat berries in the Buffalo NY / Erie, PA vacinity? I live on the border of PA. I’m sure if i looked i could find a whole foods in Buffalo, but we go up maybe 3 times a year. Also, my mom had bought me a few pounds of hard white a while back. What do you do to clean your wheat and make sure that it has no rocks etc. in it. I noticed that some of the grains/berries looked blue/moldy, so i picked them out, but it’s time consuming. Is this something i don’t really need to bother with? Thanks

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    Hi. I am researching wheat berries to try to see if I can afford it. I live south of buffalo and was wondering if you ever found a resource for your grains. I’m hoping to get them for under a dollar a pound and haven’t been able to find that yet

    [Reply]

  21. says

    Middle TN;
    Muddy Pond, Mennonite Community
    I have gotten them from the local health food store but its been years and it was more costly.
    Lower south, College-dale is a 7th Day Adventist Community and has a great health food store there that might can hook you up.
    Ask around at churches and the local free fliers and homeschool boards! The internet is full of home school boards and there’s usually a host of ladies there that are willing to help.
    Walton Feed is good if you can work out the shipping by coop or local.
    Happy Milling!

    [Reply]

  22. Lisa says

    It all makes sense now! We have a mill in town – just 10 minutes away – that is still grinding their wheat the old fashioned way (they are still powered by the water)so I just buy my freshly ground flour from there, BUT I find that for pancakes and pizza dough, I just can’t use 100% whole wheat flour because the things turn out as heavy as lead. And it didn’t make sense that you use 100% whole wheat. Now I know why – it’s hard red wheat and you use hard white. Good to know!

    [Reply]

    soonermomof7 Reply:

    The “lead” phenomenon could also be that their flour is ground more coarsely than you are used to for things like pancakes. With your own mill, you could choose a fine or coarse grind for things.

    [Reply]

  23. says

    We order a lot of our grain from Azure Standard now. However, my ILs live in the Portland, OR area, so when they come visit, they bring me big sacks of grain/flour from Bob’s Red Mill as well. :-) The problem with this is always shipping. It is really best to get it from a local place or somewhere that doesn’t charge shipping. Otherwise the shipping can almost double the price.

    [Reply]

  24. says

    Wheat Montana is back at our local Walmart!

    [Reply]

    Shelley Reply:

    How do you know if your local Walmart has the Wheat Montana?

    [Reply]

    Brenda on the S OR Coast Reply:

    At our Walmart, the wheat berries are in 20 or 25 pound
    bags on the lower shelf near the flour and other baking
    items. You could call your local store and ask, or
    just go look. On the Wheat Montana website, they listed
    Walmart as a distributer, even when our local store
    stopped carrying it last year.

    I’m so happy that it’s back! It’s much cheaper than
    ordering from somewhere far away.

    [Reply]

  25. Margie says

    My husband is a wheat farmer, so I often get my wheat straight from him after it has been cleaned. He always researches what varieties are best for milling, and I have had great results with both the red and white wheats he has selected. We only grow hard winter wheat here in western Kansas, so I have ordered soft white wheat from United Natural Foods. Ordering with a food coop is truly the most cost effective way I have found for getting wheat that is not local.
    I thought I would share with you that it may become difficult to find some hard white wheats in the future. I realize that Montana Gold has really made a name for itself and is directly marketed to home millers (and the wheat performs well.) The average farmer has to sell to the local coop, and the coops are not wanting to mess with white wheat anymore, so they are offering a lower price to the farmer starting this next year. I am really saddened by this, but many farmers will not be willing to take the financial hit.
    One other thing: my husband researched about protein content in wheat. There is an inverse relationship between protein content and test weight of wheat. (Test weight is how many pounds a bushel of wheat weighs. The average is 60 pounds. If test weight is high, the farmer gets more money for his wheat.) We learned that the wheat puts its energy into protein development first, and then if there is energy left before harvest, it goes into endosperm development. Therefore, better test weight wheat actually ends up having a lower protein content! I have no idea how the Montana Gold farmers are able to guarantee a certain protein level. Our levels vary from year to year based on growing conditions. All told, though, I have found that the varieties that promise good milling qualities do perform very well for me every year.
    Whew! I hope that was helpful to some of you.

    [Reply]

  26. Sharon says

    I’m outside of Denver, Colorado and I get mine from the local LDS cannery. You don’t have to be a member – but you do have to go with one there. Currently hard white and hard red wheat is $5.90 for 25lbs – it’s an _awesome_ deal. They also have the machinery so that you can can it into #10 cans there … or you can take it home and just pour it into buckets. They also have oatmeal, beans, powdered milk, macaroni, dried fruit, drink mixes … and lots of other stuff They also have a “wet pack” cannery where they do jams, fruit and meat. To do those you need to volunteer for a 4 hour shift and then you can buy what they are processing. It’s a great place – and no worries it’s non-proselyting. You just need to go with a member there. Ask around your neighborhood and I’m sure you’ll find someone you know.

    We also have the “bread lady” who puts together orders twice a year from wheat montana. It’s also a pretty good deal – but I’ve been happy with the cannery. Last time I went down, I bought 400 lbs of food (wheat, oatmeal, powdered milk, beans, and salsa) for less than $45.

    [Reply]

    Kim Reply:

    I too am from the Denver area and am having a real difficult time
    finding fresh grains in the city. Could you forward the address for
    this LDS center. I’ve also come across Aurora grains who does the one
    time a year buld grain shipment (November) but have not found the “bread lady”. Any help
    would be appreicated

    [Reply]

    Sharon Reply:

    Kim – happy to help.

    The “bread lady” is Nona Dutchak and her e-mail is:
    thebreadlady@gmail.com. E-mail her and she’ll add you to her e-mail
    list when she sends out the orders (spring and fall). She’s located
    in Johnstown (north of Denver) and you have to pick up the orders
    there. All of the grains come from ‘Wheat Montana’.

    The LDS cannery is located at:3233 Fraser Street in Aurora. Give
    them a call at: (303) 371-7650. They’ve always been _very_ helpful
    when I call and can give you specific information on hours & what they
    have.

    [Reply]

    Kimberly Reply:

    I am on the east side of Denver, but go to Arvada a few times a year to buy grains from http://www.familybaker.com/. Nadine is wonderful!!!
    We’re moving and looking a setting up our own bulk grain store in Gilcrest.

    [Reply]

    Rose Reply:

    I wanted to respond to your message. I have been to the LDS cannery several times. I am not a member and do not go with a friend. They let anyone go. They have canning machines for canning in #10 metal cans that you can check out for a week, even if you are not a member. No deposit, nothing. Sometimes it is good to can stuff that they don’t carry.

    Their current schedule is 9 to 3, M, T, W, Th and Sat. They are closed on Fridays and Sundays.

    [Reply]

  27. Shelly says

    After our natural foods co-op went out of business I had a hard time finding wheat. Then I found a small country store run by Mennonite. They have even better prices than the co-op. If I call ahead they’ll order me as many bags (50#) as I want.

    So I also recommend that you check for Mennonite, Amish, or Mormon (LDS) stores near you for great deals on grains.

    [Reply]

  28. Marjo says

    I get my wheat from a lady who sells wheat in Palmer, Alaska. She sells many different types of grain. I get 50 lbs of hard red, spelt, and kamut and make a mixture of the three to do most of my baking. I also get my oatmeal from her. I store it all in 50 lb tubs in my basement and keep smaller containers in my kitchen to use as needed.

    [Reply]

  29. Jen says

    Laura, I would love to start grinding my own flour! however, i will not have money to buy a grain mill anytime soon. I was wondering, can you grind it with a blender? or possible a meat grinder? i have both on hand but i dont want to waste grain if i can help it. I was also wondering if you can buy hard white wheat anywhere near lincoln nebraska? i dont really like to order from AS or amizon because i dont like to deal with shipping and pick up. thanks!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    I’m not sure using a blender would grind it as fine as you would like. I have found wheat in Lincoln here: The Grain Bin
    5591 S. 48th St.
    Lincoln, NE 68516 402-421-7384

    They carry Montana Gold wheat which is one of my favorites.

    [Reply]

  30. says

    I’m not sure using a blender would grind it as fine as you would like. I have found wheat in Lincoln here: The Grain Bin
    5591 S. 48th St.
    Lincoln, NE 68516 402-421-7384

    They carry Montana Gold wheat which is one of my favorites.

    [Reply]

  31. Danielle says

    Question for you… I’ve seen white wheat (I don’t think I saw if it had soft or hard). How many types of white wheat are there? Is it still as good as whole wheat, or what’s the deal on it?

    I’m making more bread this weekend! (i might have to double it, I told some people I was going to make them some bread lol) What have you done to me, twice in one month? (it’s a good thing, don’t worry!)

    I think I’m going to cut back the white flour too. I did 1/2 and 1/2 the last time. I couldn’t tell that I had whole wheat in there, maybe it was because I did half and half. lol You’ll be really proud when I bought MORE whole wheat flour, I got the 5 lb bag! I got the smallest bag before.

    Thanks Laura… you’ve converted one more person! Well in small steps. Have to start somewhere right?

    [Reply]

    Laura@HeavenlyHomemakers Reply:

    As far as I know there are just hard and soft white wheats. White wheat is whole wheat…just a different variety. We’re used to seeing whole wheat flour at the store which is quite dark and really looks “whole wheaty”. That’s the kind of flour made with hard RED wheat. It makes a heavier bread and I just don’t like it nearly as much. Hard WHITE wheat makes a much lighter bread and is just over all easier to eat. But, red and white wheat have the SAME nutritional value.

    I need to try to work in another blog post to discuss some of this. The term “white wheat” sounds like White flour…but it SO isn’t!

    [Reply]

    Danielle Reply:

    Thank you! I did truthfully think it was white flour lol, just w/a fancy name. But then I remembered this post!

    hmmmm… I think the white wheat just comes in a 5 lb bag, I’ll just
    stick w/the whole wheat then. I can’t believe I’m going to say this lol
    I LOVE the taste of it!

    I did check again when I was at the store, I didn’t see soft or hard white wheat. So like you said it probably is hard red wheat. Sheesh, they should say that then.

    [Reply]

  32. Merrilee says

    I am just getting into this. I received an old grain mill from a friend who used it to make bread when her kids were little (they are 10 years older than me). It works great still. :)
    I can buy 2 kinds of berries from my local grocery store for $0.69-$0.79 per pound, which works for me right now. It’s comes from Bob’s Red Mill. I’m in the Pacific NW, so we have a lot of options.

    My question…In another post, you mentioned storing the flour in the refrigerator. How long will it last in there?

    Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    Stored in the fridge, I try to use my flour within just a few days. I now keep it in the freezer so that it will keep longer.

    [Reply]

  33. Steph says

    Does anyone know of an affordable source of wheatberries in Central Texas (Waco)? About $1/pound is the best I’ve found locally. Thanks!

    [Reply]

  34. Matt says

    We are in north Texas and buy our wheat from our local healthfood store. and they give us a 20% discount for buying in bulk.
    What we are looking for is a decently priced hand grain mill.
    Any suggestions?

    [Reply]

  35. says

    For South Central Nebraskans. Titus Kitchens (www.tituskitchens.com) in Kearney, NE is a Wheat Montana Dealer. I just got off the phone with her and while she has a lot to choose from, I asked specifically about Hard White Wheat which she says she has 50lb bags for $33 in stock. You just go to her house and pick it up so no shipping, if you live in this area that’s an awesome deal no? She also said she orders in Spring and Fall and if you order at that time she gives a bigger discount for ordering more grain to go on the truck. Hope this helps someone….I’m just all aquiver with excitement because my husband ordered a Family Grain Mill for me last night from Pleasant Hill Grain! I’m planning to sprout my grain, then dehyrate and grind a couple times a week…any tips or hints welcome on getting the grain dry enough to be ground! Thanks!

    [Reply]

  36. Lara says

    I’m seriously considering buying a mill and starting to grind my own flour. I would love to be able to sample some freshly milled flour first and try it out on my family before making the investment. Unfortunately I don’t know anyone who does this. Any chance there is someone in the greater Philadelphia or Lancaster area who would be willing to show me their “operation”? I’d be happy to pay for a sampling of the flour! Thanks!

    [Reply]

  37. Scott in Wisconsin says

    Folks, consider buying Wheat Seeds.

    It’s the same as the wheat berries, but it’s cleaner, tested for germination. Just better, top end wheat.
    I’m paying $13 for a 60# bag. So much less than anything else I see, other then LDS houses.

    It’s NOT treated with chemicals.

    So look at seed companies, and give them a call.
    (Not FEED grade. Seed grade.)

    I have a 2000 lbs, stored in 5 big blue 55 gallon plastic barrels, all for under $500.

    And if the SHTF, I can plant some of it with confidence, or trade it to a farmer in return for a nice chunk of the crop.

    I Also have a barrel of Rye, Oats, Buckwheat and Triticale.
    Variety is the spice of life.
    Good luck all

    [Reply]

  38. Kathy S says

    Anyone know where to buy in Canada? We live in a farming community and are dairy farmers, but don’t grow wheat anymore. I wouldn’t even know where to look. Can you just use it straight out of the field or does it have to be cleaned etc first?

    [Reply]

  39. Michelle says

    I was all set to order the Nutrimill. Then we were at Costco over the weekend and they were demonstrating the Blendtec blender (that you can grind wheat in!) It’s supposed to be similar to the vitamix, I think. Anyway, then we went to Whole Foods and I got some wheat from the bulk section. BUT… I got soft white wheat, I think. Can I make regular bread with this or only cakes and pastries?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    With soft white wheat, you can make anything that does not call for yeast. Yeast breads require hard wheat!

    [Reply]

  40. says

    Florida girl here! I am very interested in grinding our own flour, but after looking at a few sites, I was highly discouraged by the shipping prices. It honestly looks like Amazon is the cheapest for me. But I was excited to see that Bread Beckers has a co-op in two areas close by, so I am going to wait for an email back to confirm their prices.

    Also, question on the soft vs. hard. Can I use hard white wheat in baking pancakes, muffins, etc.. things that don’t require yeast? I understand you can’t use soft white wheat for breads, only hard white. I was just wondering if I could buy just hard white wheat and use it in all my baking, yeast and non-yeast aside.

    Everyone has been so very helpful. Thank you!!

    [Reply]

    LindseyforLaura@HHM Reply:

    Yes! Laura uses hard wheat in everything.

    [Reply]

    Priscilla W Reply:

    I learned, I didn’t care for white hard wheat in peanut butter cookies…my family ate them.

    I like the white soft (pastry) flour better in cookies.

    [Reply]

  41. Terra says

    Toward the end of this post you mention that “Grain will last for a long time. If you come upon a good resource for wheat, I say buy a LOT. It will store safely for years without going bad!”

    Is that just when it’s still in berry form? I was told once that it will go rancid quickly once you grind it. What is your opinion on the shelf life after it’s ground?

    [Reply]

    LindseyforLaura@HHM Reply:

    Yes that is in the berry form. I will include a link to the posts Laura
    wrote that go more in depth on this!

    http://heavenlyhomemakers.com/grain-mills-pt-2-which-ones-do-i-recommend-where-should-you-buy-one
    http://heavenlyhomemakers.com/grain-mills-pt-1-should-you-buy-one-does-it-save-money

    [Reply]

  42. Rae says

    Amazon is actually the best price I’ve found in my area (northern Colorado). I especially like the spelt berries from Great River Organic Milling.

    [Reply]

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